Guitar store – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 07:03:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deimel.biz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Guitar store – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ 32 32 9 of the Best Indoor Things to Do in Portland, Oregon https://deimel.biz/9-of-the-best-indoor-things-to-do-in-portland-oregon/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/9-of-the-best-indoor-things-to-do-in-portland-oregon/ Portland, Oregon is known for its beautiful scenery, hiking trails and outdoor lifestyle. It is also known for rain – the city receives around 36 inches of rain annually. But the people of Portland are smart, and they’ve created an indoor culture of cafes, donut shops, and craft breweries to keep them happy no matter […]]]>

Portland, Oregon is known for its beautiful scenery, hiking trails and outdoor lifestyle.

It is also known for rain – the city receives around 36 inches of rain annually.

But the people of Portland are smart, and they’ve created an indoor culture of cafes, donut shops, and craft breweries to keep them happy no matter the weather.

You could easily spend your days trying them all, but here are nine more reasons you’ll wish for rain.

The Nine

The Nines is synonymous with luxury and comfort — Photo courtesy of The Nines

Located in the historic Meier & Frank building, this luxury hotel is such a cozy place to hole up for a few days. If you can bear to leave your beautifully appointed room, there are plenty of cozy places to explore, like the library — filled with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves — and an indoor atrium surrounded by artwork.

Also check out their two upscale restaurants – Departure on the top floor offers modern Asian cuisine, the largest sake selection in town and fantastic views, while Urban Farmer offers local and sustainable dishes. Luckily, the fitness center at Nines never closes, so you can eliminate some of those calories.

twisted crescent

Twisted Croissant's storefront is filled with impossible choicesThe Twisted Croissant window is filled with impossible choices — Photo courtesy of Lois Alter Mark

Alright, you might be better off not knowing about this little gem, because you’ll want it to become your morning (or afternoon, or anytime) routine. Each Croissant from Twisted Croissant takes three days to make and about five minutes to eat. You’ll try to slow down to really savor the flavor, but it gets harder and harder as you taste each flaky layer.

There’s a pain au chocolat that puts others to shame, but there are also pastries like the Maple Banana Croissant Donut and Pumpkin Praline Cruffin that will leave you in awe. Because those decisions are just too hard, don’t be surprised to hear you order one of each. Sorry.

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry

Test your engineering skills at OMSITest your engineering skills at OMSI — Photo courtesy of Lois Alter Mark

The museum’s official title, “Oregon Museum of Science and Industry,” belies the sheer enjoyment you’ll have here, so locals simply call it OMSI.

Five halls are filled with over 200 hands-on activities and exhibits. You can put on glasses and conduct a chemistry experiment, get shaken up in a simulated earthquake, solve real-life puzzles, and design your own city. Warning: You may have to fight some small children to get a ride.

Umami Café, Portland Japanese Garden

Have tea at the Umami Café in the Portland Japanese GardenHave tea at Umami Café in the Portland Japanese Garden — Photo courtesy of Portland Japanese Garden

This world famous Japanese garden is beautiful even in bad weather, but the best way to enjoy it one of these days is at Umami Café, its authentic Japanese teahouse.

Floating above the hill, the café’s design is inspired by the Kiyomizu-dera temple in Kyoto and provides a charming setting for a traditional tea ceremony. You can choose from a selection of carefully selected teas with sweet or savory accompaniments, and you’ll feel so relaxed you’ll want to make it a daily habit.

Portland Museum of Art

Installation view of Installation view of “Paige Powell: The Ride” (2015) at the Portland Art Museum — Photo courtesy of the Portland Art Museum

It’s no surprise that this museum is considered Oregon’s premier cultural institution. Representing a wide variety of diverse communities, with a mission of inclusion for all, the Portland Art Museum houses more than 42,000 objects reflecting the history of art from antiquity to the present day.

With over 112,000 square feet of gallery space, the Portland Art Museum ranks among the top 25 art museums in the nation, making it a great place to spend a rainy day. It also has a welcoming café and a museum shop.

Pine Street Market

Pine Street Market is Portland's premier food hallPine Street Market is Portland’s premier food hall — Photo courtesy of Pine Street Market

This city’s premier food hall is spot on, housing some of Portland’s favorites under one roof. This rooftop happens to be on the famous Carriage & Baggage building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Whatever your craving, from Pleasure Burger to Kotsu Ramen to Pine Street Tap Room, you’ll find it here. Quickly becoming the perfect place to catch up with friends or simply satisfy a craving, Pine Street Market is about to make history.

Powell’s City of Books

Powell's City of Books is a reader's paradiseThe City of Powell Books is a reader’s paradise — Photo courtesy of Travel Portland

Known as the world’s largest independent bookstore, Powell’s flagship store takes up an entire city block and is home to a million new and used books. Nine color-coded rooms are categorized into 3,500 sections, making it impossible not to find something you want to read. More precisely, impossible not to find dozens of books to read, so save space in your suitcase.

Visit the Rare Book Room (open on weekends), pick up bookmarks with suggested reading lists, and settle in with your purchases in the cafe or one of the welcoming nooks and crannies. For readers, there’s no better place to spend a cold, wet day than this iconic Portland landmark.

MadeHere PDX

Buy handcrafted items from local makers on MadeHere PDXShop for handcrafted items from local makers at MadeHere PDX — Photo courtesy of Travel Portland

If you can’t make it to Portland’s Saturday Market, MadeHere PDX is a great indoor option for finding the best locally made crafts.

Portland is a maker’s paradise, and 150 of them are represented here. You’ll find everything from unique jewelry and household items to sauces and soaps. These are the real souvenirs to bring back from a city where creativity reigns.

Hotel Zags

The Zags Hotel Gear Shed has everything you need for a rainy (or sunny) dayThe Gear Shed at the Zags Hotel has everything you need for a rainy (or sunny) day — Photo courtesy of the Zags Portland Hotel

What makes Zags Boutique Hotel so special in inclement weather, along with a game room offering everything from a pool table to a full-size Connect Four, is the one-of-a-kind Gear Shed.

The Gear Shed is like a stripped-down version of your garage, storing all sorts of outdoor gear like bikes and skateboards, plus things to keep you entertained indoors, including a guitar, cameras and a Nintendo Switch. Best of all, it’s all free for customers.

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Out of the past – Sidney Daily News https://deimel.biz/out-of-the-past-sidney-daily-news/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 05:25:23 +0000 https://deimel.biz/out-of-the-past-sidney-daily-news/ 125 years November 18, 1897 The outlook is that the Northwest Ohio Oil Field will eventually expand into at least the northern part of Shelby County. The first producing well in this county was drilled in Van Buren Township last week and is now producing 30 barrels per day. The well at the Philip Maurer […]]]>

125 years

November 18, 1897

The outlook is that the Northwest Ohio Oil Field will eventually expand into at least the northern part of Shelby County. The first producing well in this county was drilled in Van Buren Township last week and is now producing 30 barrels per day. The well at the Philip Maurer farm was a wild business, but it is a good business and the owners are very happy with it.

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Philip Sheets and Sons has secured the right of way from Botkins to Geyer City and will erect a telephone line by January 1.

100 years

November 18, 1922

Hundreds of people visited the new gift shop when it opened today and found it to be one of the most attractive shops in town. Visitors praised the owners, Mrs. Mark Miller and Miss Carolyne Klipstine, for the beautiful effect they achieved in the room and praised many of the items on display. The shop is located above the Beech Tea Store on the east side of the square and at a later date the owners plan to open a tea room to the rear of the showroom.

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An interesting statement on her recent trip abroad, in which she made comparisons between methods of education in Europe and America, was given by Mrs. Edith McClure Patterson of Dayton, when she spoke at of the Tourist Club meeting held yesterday afternoon at the home of Mrs. JC McClure on St. Marys Avenue.

75 years old

November 18, 1947

Dr. Raymond Stockstill, grandson of Dr. and Mrs. WD Stockstill, near Sidney, resigned from his veterinary practice in the Quincy community to accept a position at a veterinary hospital in Newcastle, Pennsylvania. The young man graduated from Ohio State University two years ago and had practiced with his grandfather here before moving to Quincy to establish his own practice.

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Waldo A. Patton had secured one vote in the recount of ballots in the recent mayoral election, increasing his margin to eight, following the top 10 precincts recounted by the board of elections last night.

50 years

November 18, 1972

About 50,000 Christmas seal packets were sent out by volunteers in Shelby, Darke, Miami and Logan counties. Honorary Chairman, Congressman William McCulloch of Piqua is spearheading the campaign to reach out to all former contributors and newcomers in the Midwest Ohio region to reach a goal of $63,000.

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Steve Liddy, a stalwart of the Lehman grid and one of Versailles’ Agne twins, was recognized today with spots on the Dayton Journal-Herald All-Area Team.

Liddy, who helped Lehman to a 6-4 record, earned a final position on the defensive unit. He is a sturdy standout with the eldest weighing 232 pounds and standing six-foot-three.

Bruce Agne is about 10 pounds heavier than his twin brother, Jeff, and stands two inches taller at six-foot-three.

25 years

November 18, 1997

Twelve years ago, Chris Barhorst played guitar in a heavy metal band, he worked at Alcoa Building Products. Little did he know that a career in ministry was in his future. He recently accepted a position as pastor of the Congregational Christian Church in Houston. He still works at Alcoa, but he now also works for the Lord.

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Wright State University produced a piece called “1913: The Great Dayton Flood. It was based on the stories of 90 Flood survivors. The play was selected as the opening production at a college festival at the Kennedy Center in Washington last March. A rare film has been discovered by Frank Grube in the basement of his mother’s house in Dayton. He showed the consequences of the flood.

This news from back issues of the Sidney Daily News is compiled by the Shelby County Historical Society (937-498-1653) as a public service to the community. Local history on the Internet! www.shelbycountyhistory.org

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This week in Mendocino: A blues legend visits the Point Arena, bizarre art in Fort Bragg, modern dance in Ukiah and macabre history in Mendocino. • The Mendocino Voice | Mendocino County, CAThe Mendocino Voice https://deimel.biz/this-week-in-mendocino-a-blues-legend-visits-the-point-arena-bizarre-art-in-fort-bragg-modern-dance-in-ukiah-and-macabre-history-in-mendocino-the-mendocino-voice-mendocino-county-ca/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 01:36:10 +0000 https://deimel.biz/this-week-in-mendocino-a-blues-legend-visits-the-point-arena-bizarre-art-in-fort-bragg-modern-dance-in-ukiah-and-macabre-history-in-mendocino-the-mendocino-voice-mendocino-county-ca/ MENDOCINO Co., 11/14/22 – This week we are featuring four unique events that represent the diverse cultural tastes of Mendocino County. On the coast, you’ll find the eccentric artistry of a Comptche artist, a blues legend in concert, and the fascinating traditions of Mendocino burial customs. Inland presents the return of modern dance to the […]]]>

MENDOCINO Co., 11/14/22 – This week we are featuring four unique events that represent the diverse cultural tastes of Mendocino County. On the coast, you’ll find the eccentric artistry of a Comptche artist, a blues legend in concert, and the fascinating traditions of Mendocino burial customs. Inland presents the return of modern dance to the stage after two years. It’s also a last chance to enjoy a touch of creativity and calm before holiday obligations fill our diaries. Don’t miss my weekly live music roundup here.

Thursday November 17: Embrace your inner weirdness at this Fort Bragg art exhibit
Hans Bruhner, a Swedish-born, Comptche-based assemblage artist, died earlier this year, and Partners Gallery is holding a retrospective of his work titled ‘Odd is Good’. Bruhner traveled the world to acquire items found in junk heaps, antique stores, garage sales and back alleys. He took his findings back to his Comptche workshop, which his wife Anne Bruhner called “a brocante”, and created mythical creatures from old wood, leather and metal as well as Dada-esque wall hangings with photos and fabrics. Bruhner’s work is surreal, fascinating, and shows how one man’s bric-a-brac is another man’s treasure. “Odd is Good” runs now through December 2, 2022 at Partners Gallery in Fort Bragg, Thursday through Monday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“Perspectives” is the Mendocino College Repertory Dance Company’s first in-person performance in two years. (Courtesy picture)

Friday, November 18: Explore the art of modern dance at Ukiah
After a two-year hiatus from live performances, the Mendocino College Repertory Dance Company returns to the stage with “Perspectives,” a collection of new choreographic works. Whether you are an avid modern dance fan or new to the field, this dance night is an opportunity to orient yourself to this art form, which casts a wide net across genres, music and technique.

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The performance is a who’s who of Mendocino County dance talent: Trudy McCreanor, director of the Mendocino Ballet; Kara Starkweather, director of the Mendocino Dance Project; Paloma Rodriguez, originally from Puerto Rico and teacher at the Mendocino Ballet; and Eryn Schon-Brunner, who was born and raised in Willits and teaches dance at Mendocino College. “Perspectives” also includes new work by Cirque du Soleil collaborator Stefan Haves. The exhibition includes works that explore physical interactions after years of social distancing and the complexity of visual impairment. It also includes a comedic combination of Christmas and condiments and a Brazilian Lambada dance party. All ages, 7 p.m., $10-$15, 7:30 p.m., CPVA Theater, Mendocino College, 1000 Hensley Creek Rd, Ukiah. The show runs until Sunday, November 20. Buy your tickets here.

John Primer performs at the Arena Theater on Saturday November 19. (Marilyn Stringer)

Saturday, November 19: A blues legend graces the Point Arena stage
Arena Theater continues its Blues on the Coast series with two-time Grammy-nominated Chicago blues icon John Primer. Born in Mississippi into a family of sharecroppers, Primer moved to Chicago at the age of eighteen and began working on Maxwell Street, where the Chicago blues was born. He formed his first band in 1964 and eventually became a fixture on the Chicago music scene, singing and playing guitar alongside Buddy Guy, the Rolling Stones and Magic Slim. He was also the bandleader for Muddy Waters. Primer has received two Grammy Lifetime Achievement Awards and is a member of the Chicago Blues Hall of Fame. As Primer says of himself “You can’t paint the blues without Primer.” He will be joined by harmonica player Bob Corritone. All ages, 7 p.m. $25, Arena Theater, 214 Main St., Point Arena. Tickets on sale here.

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Kelley House Museum’s ‘Good Mourning’ exhibition now runs until November 27, 2022. (Photo courtesy)

Sunday November 20: Explore the macabre world of Mendocino’s mourning customs
Halloween may be over, but the cycle of life continues and humanity’s fascination with death remains. This concern and the rituals that underlie it are at the center of the Kelley House Museum’s “Good Mourning” exhibition. The exhibit showcases the Mendocino County burial customs of the county’s many diverse cultures, including the Pomo, Chinese Taoists, and Victorian pioneers. Highlights include artifacts and the story behind Cannarr Funeral Home, a woman-owned funeral home in Mendocino; the dramatic feud between two pioneering undertakers; and Pomo basketry used in burial practices. Add a private tour of the Mendocino Pioneer Cemetery ($20 per person, two people minimum) during which you’ll learn the stories behind those buried there. I recently took a tour with curator Marguerite O’Brien, and it not only provided additional context to the exhibit, but changed the way I view Mendocino’s architecture and history. “Good Morning” runs now until November 27, 2022 at the Kelley House Museum. Admission is free with a suggested $5 donation. The Kelley House Museum is open Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., (707) 937-5791, 45007 Albion St., Mendocino.

Got an event you’d like me to consider including? Email me at [email protected].

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Brian Douglas Boggs, 46 | Port City Daily https://deimel.biz/brian-douglas-boggs-46-port-city-daily/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 23:52:46 +0000 https://deimel.biz/brian-douglas-boggs-46-port-city-daily/ CAROLINA BEACH – Brian Douglas Boggs of Carolina Beach, North Carolina, died on November 6, 2022, at the age of 46. Brian had a left-handed creative sense and enjoyed drawing and writing from an early age. He had a love of music, probably inspired by his late mother’s love and skill at the piano. His […]]]>

CAROLINA BEACH – Brian Douglas Boggs of Carolina Beach, North Carolina, died on November 6, 2022, at the age of 46.

Brian had a left-handed creative sense and enjoyed drawing and writing from an early age. He had a love of music, probably inspired by his late mother’s love and skill at the piano. His friends and family would describe him as humble, kind, humorous and generous. He would give the shirt off his back to help another in need. He lived his life detached from the need for material things but instead sought to be present in the simple gifts of life often taken for granted.

He could carry the world on his shoulders and still find grace in his daily needs. He had a wonderful sense of humor and could make others laugh. He had the ability to see the silver lining in difficult situations. He enjoyed uplifting others and making people feel appreciated.

He spent his final years in Carolina Beach surrounded by a large group of friends with whom he enjoyed playing music, boating, and fishing. His primary modes of transportation were on foot and by bicycle, allowing him to slow down and savor the coast he called home. Often you could find him hanging on his porch playing the guitar. Her time in Carolina Beach was dedicated to creating happy memories with her son, Jake. They enjoyed the summer days of walks on the boardwalk, fun adventures, swimming in all the hotel pools and eating slices at Fentoni’s Pizza, a favorite for both of them.

Jake was the love of her life.

He loved his family and friends and was very grateful for their love and companionship.

Raised in the small town of Graham NC, he attended Graham High School. One of his first jobs (and probably his favorite) was at Keith’s music store. A small progressive music store in Burlington, NC, where he spent years introducing others to various artists they may not have known before.

Bob Dylan was a special artist whom he seemed to introduce to several others. He and his sister Keeley have attended several Bob Dylan concerts together over the years as well as many other shows and festivals such as Smilefest at its original location of Hodgin Valley Farm, Greensboro, North Carolina. A Not Fade Away Entertainment production, which was a bit of an invitation-only at first.

Brian is survived by his father, Doug Boggs, his sister Keeley Des Autels, his son, Jake Boggs, and his niece, Ruby Des Autels. He was predeceased by his loving and devoted mother, Carolyn Boggs.

He spent his last days on earth with his family and surrounded by love.

A celebration of life will take place at a later date and everyone will be notified when these details are finalized.

In Brian’s honor, please donate to the GoFundMe or the NC Sea Grant program which funds current awareness. North Carolina Sea Grant facilitates funding of millions of dollars in research, outreach and education programs each year. Their initiatives and projects touch on a wide range of topics, including fisheries, seafood science and technology, water quality, aquaculture, community development, law and policy, and coastal hazards.

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Stüssy x Dries Van Noten Flea Fronts Collaboration Campaign https://deimel.biz/stussy-x-dries-van-noten-flea-fronts-collaboration-campaign/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 16:58:03 +0000 https://deimel.biz/stussy-x-dries-van-noten-flea-fronts-collaboration-campaign/ After teasers courtesy of A$AP NAST and a short video of the duo themselves, Stüssy and Dries Van Noten reunited to explore their next collaboration in an official campaign led by founding member and bassist of The Reds. Hot Chilli Peppers, Flea. Shot by Tyrone Lebon, the campaign sees Flea in her usual carefree state, […]]]>

After teasers courtesy of A$AP NAST and a short video of the duo themselves, Stüssy and Dries Van Noten reunited to explore their next collaboration in an official campaign led by founding member and bassist of The Reds. Hot Chilli Peppers, Flea.

Shot by Tyrone Lebon, the campaign sees Flea in her usual carefree state, bouncing around the room while playing her bass guitar, playing basketball, or just jumping for joy wearing the Stüssy x Dries Van Noten collaborative clothes.

In a collaboration many were shocked to see, it becomes clear the collection was meant to be – Stüssy’s So-Cal style is accentuated by Dries’ ability to play with and manipulate color and pattern. The psychedelic is everywhere, as paraphernalia adorns the back of a military green parka alongside a myriad of colors blending together like a rainbow smokescreen. Peace signs, flowers, and embroidered appliqués can be found on the standout garment, influencing much of what else can be found in the capsule.

The collab effort continues with double-branded tie-dye tees, sweatpants and sweatshirts, camp-collar shirts, loose-fitting printed jeans, and a rhinestone blazer and slacks — the latter being the most evocative of Dries’ work. What would be a simple black suit was given an irreverent makeover by the duo, dazzling in the light as rhinestones create sparkling stripes all over Dries Van Noten’s blazer and trousers. Elsewhere, the designer’s use of ink-like spills explode onto track pants in more psychedelic forms, while Stüssy emblems like the 8-ball also sport a DVN makeover on pieces like the varsity jacket.

Stüssy and Dries Van Noten will be available worldwide at select Chapter Stores, select Dover Street Market locations, Dries Van Noten stores, on the Stüssy website and on the Dries Van Noten website on Friday, November 18 at 10:00 a.m. PST, 10:00 a.m. CET, and 10:00 a.m. JST per respective region. Take a closer look at the campaign above.

For more must-see collabs, check out Junya Watanabe for Baracuta.

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Crawl space: November 2022 | visual art https://deimel.biz/crawl-space-november-2022-visual-art/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/crawl-space-november-2022-visual-art/ “Present,” Alex McClurg Wedgewood-Houston Wedgewood-Houston’s First Saturday events have been much quieter since Infinity Cat Recordings moved out of its headquarters at 467 Humphreys St. several years ago. We can always count on a local band playing on the porch of the Julia Martin Gallery at opening receptions, and WXNA DJs help keep The Packing […]]]>






“Present,” Alex McClurg


Wedgewood-Houston

Wedgewood-Houston’s First Saturday events have been much quieter since Infinity Cat Recordings moved out of its headquarters at 467 Humphreys St. several years ago. We can always count on a local band playing on the porch of the Julia Martin Gallery at opening receptions, and WXNA DJs help keep The Packing Plant stage going, but we’d love to hear more music – weird, sexy , sacred, raw and wild music – at the heart of Nashville’s contemporary art scene.

Obviously, wanting to hear more different music in Nashville isn’t the biggest ask in the world, and the Chestnut Street Concert Series already widens the sound options in the crawl. The series began in October, and the November concert is free for all ages and includes the funky synth country of The Gentlemen of Kentucky and the cinematic soul beats of the instrumental duo Mount Worcester. The show opens at 8:15 p.m. Saturday with the propulsive pop of indie truly Twen. The title track from Twen’s latest release, One Stop Shop (for a Fading Revolution), pits arrangements of spilled wine against loud guitars to raise a glass to the apocalypse. The Chestnut Street Concert Series takes place at the bandstand in The outfieldwhich incorporates into its design the iconic guitar-shaped scoreboard of Greer Stadium – the former home of the Nashville Sounds.

KT Hamlin opens Reused at Open gallery Saturday evening. Hamlin is a recent Lipscomb graduate, and this clearly titled eco-conscious fashion exhibit features feminine skirts and dresses made from second-hand and upcycled materials such as grocery bags, curtains and denim scraps. . The opening reception is from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Senza Nome means “nameless” in Italian, and this new exhibition at modfellowsThe Wedgewood-Houston outpost offers a kind of Dogma 95-esque manifesto that interrogates the decision-making processes of collectors, as well as the often overlooked rituals of the art market. Senza Nome is a collective exhibition circumscribed by a trio of rules that bind the creative processes of the different artists, while unifying them in a solidarity of the market: Each work is based on the 12 x 12 x 1.5 inch wooden panels gallery arrangement of artists; all works will be hung anonymously respecting the title of the exhibition; and – here’s the kicker – each work will be sold at the same price. I’m not averse to a bit of gallery play when the rules are as provocative and irreverent as these. The Danish filmmakers who created the rules for the movie Dogma 95 (the “vows of chastity”) demanded that the directors be uncredited and, hopefully, Senza Nome will result in panels as inspired as Celebration, or as poetic as Julien the donkey-boy. The opening reception is from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Saturday evening.

Nashville-based artist Elise Drake refers to his latest creations as “textual works in bas-relief”. The utilitarian phrase evokes stuffy images of architecture textbooks and YouTube rabbit holes of art history documentaries. Utterbox open to Julia Martin Gallery on Saturday nights, but instead of a dusty, ancient display of Egyptian hieroglyphs or a medieval Latin stone sermon, Drake’s new series undoubtedly debuts contemporary works that use tinted resins and plasters. to create modern messages in candy palettes. This display conveys poetic messages like, “I create memories with you in my dreams. I wake up to remember that you are a ghost. But what stands out loud and clear is the sensual overload of Drake’s textual forms and colors, deliciously suspended between painting and sculpture. The opening reception is from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday evening.

Cooperative retrograde for the rest of the year after a memorable run in 2022 in a new, expanded gallery space. Instead of scheduling gallery shows in November and December, Coop aims to be your first stop when shopping for artistic, creative, and unique gifts this holiday season. That of the gallery Vacation Cooperative the artists’ markets will take place every Saturday in November from noon to 8 p.m. When Coop moved to its much larger and more expensive gallery space at The Packing Plant this year, it was followed by a very successful push to add a whole new rash of artists to their membership roster. This indoor bazaar will be a great way to learn about new artists at Coop, while offering holiday shoppers the opportunity to treat friends and family to works by their favorite local designers.

Downtown

The Navigation Room Gallery of the Town Center Presbyterian Church continues to give galleries a reason to crawl downtown, despite the thinning of the Fifth Avenue gallery scene following the closure of the Rymer Gallery – not to mention the ongoing purchase and renovation of The Arcade . This Saturday evening, the gallery proves that it is totally shaken from the lingering boredom of its pandemic closure with a deft exhibition of formalist painting. Painter based in Birmingham, Alabama Alex McClurgit is Present is a series of works in acrylic and spray paint on canvas. Local gallerygoers may recall McClurg’s name and work from group shows at the Red Arrow Gallery in 2019. McClurg’s interlocking geometric patterns are applied in layers reminiscent of digital image processing or older graphic and printing techniques. The results are precision painted patterns full of retro vibes – geometric abstracts that read like circuit board landscapes or early concept art from tron. This exhibition of medium to small canvases is a perfect fit for The Browsing Room, and it’s probably the best painting exhibition to open on Saturday night. Here’s hoping we see more work from McClurg in Nashville.

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Jerry Garcia’s Lost Owsley Stanley Pipe Found – Rolling Stone https://deimel.biz/jerry-garcias-lost-owsley-stanley-pipe-found-rolling-stone/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/jerry-garcias-lost-owsley-stanley-pipe-found-rolling-stone/ For decades, a A major piece of counterculture history was stuck behind a bed in Merl Saunders’ San Francisco home. The crude pipe looks like something a teenager might have tinkered with at summer camp, but according to art historian Steve Cabella, it is essentially a religious object. A so-called “spirit pipe,” this particular tool […]]]>

For decades, a A major piece of counterculture history was stuck behind a bed in Merl Saunders’ San Francisco home.

The crude pipe looks like something a teenager might have tinkered with at summer camp, but according to art historian Steve Cabella, it is essentially a religious object. A so-called “spirit pipe,” this particular tool was made by LSD pioneer Augustus Owsley Stanley for Grateful Dead frontman Jerry Garcia, and it’s been MIA for decades.

“I’ve bought party pipes from rockers before,” says Cabella, owner of California antique store The Modern i. Rolling stone. “It’s just funny little things; they don’t have a story for them. No lost story. No connection lost. This is a different object. It’s kind of a holy grail in many ways, because obviously when [Jerry] was smoking that pipe that he was playing music at the time and that’s where he was getting the spirit from – the creativity. rolling stone contacted the band for comment but did not hear back.

The history of the Grateful Dead and Owsley is as intertwined as, well, drugs and rock & roll. Stanley – whose name is officially in the dictionary describing a strain of pure LSD – was the band’s original soundman and backer. He developed their distinctive Wall of Sound, helped design their logo and, of course, kept them on par with LSD. The group even immortalized Stanley in a song: “Alice D. Millionaire” from 1967, a variant of a title about the arrest of the so-called “acid king”. Although he was close to the whole group, Stanley was particularly attracted to Garcia. In a 2007 interview with rolling stone, Stanley called the leader of the Dead “the sun at the center of the solar system. Take out the sun, and the planets go their own way. Garcia was the center. Once he stopped exploring, the whole scene stopped exploring.

This arrest would not be the last of Stanley’s legal troubles; in the early ’70s, he eventually ended up in prison, where he honed the skills he would later use to make Garcia’s spirit pipe, as well as other pieces of what he called ” wearable sculptures,” according to Cabella. Rhoney Stanley, Owsley’s ex and LSD partner-in-crime, recounts rolling stone that he gave her one of his first pieces when she visited him in prison: a metal heart with wings, a reference to the Hells Angels. “I wore it the other night,” she said. “He always had to have the best materials. He was an artist. I was so impressed that he found this outlet to get through the prison.

Steve Cabelle

Although Rhoney says she never received a “liquor pipe” from Stanley, she says he made her one in the shape of a whale, along with other jewelry. She also learned how to make wearable sculptures, using the molding skills she learned going into dental school. In his book, Owsley and Me: My LSD Family, Rhoney describes Stanley giving her this metal heart: “’I work in the shop, I learn metallurgy, I make jewelry. This is for you,” she recalled saying. “It doesn’t exactly lie flat. My first piece. I will improve myself. (He would later try to get her to pay $10,000 for a white, ruby-eyed Pegasus.)

In Cabella’s opinion, Stanley never really improved. “If you look at Owsley’s early rock posters, they’re really cute,” he says. “They are like an eighth grader made them. They are very basic, as are her jewelry making techniques. … [Jerry’s pipe] looks like someone with a few years of art school produced it and did their best. Looks like a hippie did it.

“In my mind, Stanley was never a good artist,” he adds. “Copied is the wrong word, borrowed is the wrong word, stolen is the wrong word, but he would use other people’s designs or ask people to do the designs he had in mind .”

Cabella has carved out a place for himself in the art world as far as Stanley is concerned; he says he first encountered it in a jewelry-making class at the College of Marin in the late 80s, then acquired a brass Stanley belt buckle in the shape of an album cover from 1976 from the Dead. steal your face of a poster collector. Cabella gained a solid reputation as a purveyor of all things Dead around 20 years ago, however, when he came across a red 1949 Studebaker truck while checking in on a jeweler’s property in Berkeley. . He got the truck for a song, only later finding out that it belonged to Stanley during the time he was making sound for the dead. Dubbed the Dread Dormammu – after a Dr. Strange villain – the truck was sold to a private collector three years ago for around $24,000, which is basically what Cabella spent restoring it.

Sound engineer and former LSD cook Owsley Stanley (known as The Bear) is seen on stage with the Grateful Dead at Polo Fields in Golden Gate Park, November 1991 in San Francisco, California.

Ed Perlstein/Redferns/Getty Images

His experience with dead objects — especially those related to Stanley — made Cabella a natural first stop for Merl Saunders Jr. about a decade after he discovered Garcia’s pipe behind a built-in bed while renovating his son’s house. father after his death in 2008. Saunders Jr. sold it to Cabella for a few thousand dollars, “basically all my budget I had to buy rare rock posters at the time, but it seemed like a no-brainer “, says Cabella. Saunders Jr. replied to rolling stoneThe initial email confirms that he sold the pipe to Cabella, but did not respond to follow-ups.

Cabella says Saunders Jr. told him Garcia kept the pipe at his father’s house after the rock star was arrested in Golden Gate Park with a briefcase of drugs in 1985. He briefly quit drugs after the arrest, but , according to a letter from Saunders’ son, Garcia smoked a pipe when he was recording 1991’s Rainforest Blues with Saunders – and on many other occasions.

“The pipe is a special thing. Merl Saunders’ son told me that [no one else smoked out of it]Cabella says. “It was Jerry’s pipe. Only Jerry’s pipe. It was obviously used, but it never became a party pipe. That’s the only reason it still exists, because it was lost and no one could find it. Everyone forgot it. »

When Cabella first got the pipe, he wasn’t entirely aware of its history. Of course, Saunders Jr.’s letter mentioned that it was “a personal gift from Owsley to Jerry”, but it took a bit of research to find out that it was actually made by Stanley – and why and when. Due to his history with Stanley’s work, Cabella was able to ascertain that the pipe had been fashioned by the man himself – with an odd little skull made from God knows what accompanied it. The pipe itself offered even more clues. First, there was an ivory medallion at the bottom of the pipe, which features a roughly carved image of a large cat sitting proudly in the center of a setting sun. The image is identical to the cover of the Jerry Garcia Band’s 1978 album, Cats under the stars. From there, Cabella was able to guess when, approximately, the pipe was made.

Steve Cabelle

And then there was a carved image of a crouching tiger on a hill. Again, though crude, it’s a lookalike of the inlaid design on Garcia’s famous guitar, Tiger, made by luthier Doug Irwin in the late ’70s. (Irwin did not respond to rolling stonerequest for comment.) Cabella believes the Tiger was Garcia’s spirit animal, as given to him by Stanley, recalling the origin story of the Tiger guitar. When shown another of Irwin’s instruments, dubbed “The Rosewood”, Garcia was caught with an imbedded image of a large cat on the electronic plate, which led to the prominent appearance of the animal on his now iconic instrument.

“Owsley would anoint people with a spirit animal. Owsley’s first partner [Melissa Cargill] is called Owl, that was his spirit name,” Cabella says, surmising that Garcia was given his own spirit name and, in turn, a spirit pipe bearing his likeness. According to Cabella, Stanley’s widow, Sheilah, also has a blowjob, but won’t share pictures of it. “You don’t show them to people. You don’t show spiritual pipes,” he says. “They are not new. It’s like finding a religious object; it becomes a historical object. There is a responsibility to that.

Now, it seems, the blame lies with Cabella, who is loath to sell the piece – which apparently still smells of burnt drugs – or give it to a former museum. “I am very attached to the preservation of exhibitions and to education. So the next place it resides can’t just be a pot museum. It’s more than that,” he said. “I don’t want it to end up somewhere where someone smokes it. It was Jerry’s job.

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Jeff Beck and Johnny Depp thrill fans during surreal Chicago shoot https://deimel.biz/jeff-beck-and-johnny-depp-thrill-fans-during-surreal-chicago-shoot/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 22:36:03 +0000 https://deimel.biz/jeff-beck-and-johnny-depp-thrill-fans-during-surreal-chicago-shoot/ Jeff Beck (left) and Johnny Depp (right) perform onstage at the Chicago Theater. sunday october … [+] February 23, 2022 in Chicago, IL Photo by Barry Brecheisen The collaboration is an idea that has often influenced the career of English guitarist Jeff Beck, who worked in the band Yardbirds and Jeff Beck before recording albums […]]]>

The collaboration is an idea that has often influenced the career of English guitarist Jeff Beck, who worked in the band Yardbirds and Jeff Beck before recording albums with artists like Jan Hammer, Jed Leiber, Imelda May and many others. , en route to US album sales of over five million over nearly six decades.

His latest studio album 18 sees the legendary guitarist working closely with actor and musician Johnny Depp, best known for a filmography responsible for three Oscar nominations, as well as working with artists like Shane MacGowan, Iggy Pop, Oasis and the Hollywood supergroup Vampires (which places him alongside Alice Cooper and Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry).

Released last July 18 finds the duo creating a pair of original compositions while putting their own spin on eleven covers ranging from the sunny pop of the Beach Boys to the post punk goth rock of Killing Joke.

The album is the centerpiece of their current tour, which crosses the United States until mid-November (before Depp’s recently announced European dates with Hollywood Vampires in 2023).

Most of the new album is instrumental, with Depp providing vocals for a handful of tracks. The duo mostly stuck to this format on stage Sunday night at the Chicago Theater, a performance where banter was kept to a minimum.

“Thanks!” Beck said after “Big Block.” “Johnny! It’s Johnny!” he said at the end of the show, pointing left at the guitarist, Depp only adding vocals as the duo opted to let the music do the talking for 90 minutes. .

Backed by a powerful three-piece band (drummer Anika Nilles, bassist Rhonda Smith and keyboardist Robert Stevenson), Beck kicked things off, with Depp joining the set halfway through for six songs before returning during the encore.

While Depp was content to cede center stage to Beck, Beck was equally generous to his bandmates, allowing the trio’s latent jazz backbone to shine throughout.

Beck reworked the classic “Freeway Jam” to open the show, bringing the hook to the fore. Arms spread wide, he flashed a huge smile as the song drew to a close, with this year’s dates marking his first performances since 2019.

Beck walked to the left, approaching his band as “Loose Cannon” began next. Smith had his left foot on the drum riser as the two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Famer glanced over his left shoulder and back, beaming at his band before raising his right arm in sign of triumph at the end of the song.

Stevenson’s keyboards shone during an atmospheric intro to “Midnight Walker,” the new album’s finest moment and one highlighted by Beck’s deliberate, soulful choice on Sunday night in Chicago.

Sunglasses on his back, Beck performed as the vocals of Brian Wilson on a delightful cover of The Beach Boys’ “Caroline No,” with the guitarist later switching to dialog during Robert Johnson’s “Me and the Devil Blues.” .

Beck really locked in with Smith during “Big Block,” the early shredding giving way to more bluesy licks as the song progressed, the force of the rhythm section on full display. But nowhere was the band’s power clearer than during “You Know You Know,” a Mahavishnu Orchestra cut that featured long drum and bass solos from Nilles and Smith.

“It’s great to be back here in Chicago,” Beck said after “Cause We’ve Ended as Lovers.” “Better to have help for the next one,” he said as Depp, looking like a rock and roll drifter, took to the stage for the first time on Sunday donning a scarf, sunglasses and a hat.

“We love you, Johnny!” began an almost unbroken barrage of affection for the actor and musician. Some fans were dressed in Pirates of the Caribbean cosplay, showcasing a continuous cacophony of screams, screams, howls and moans throughout the Sunday night concert.

Beck and Depp conjured up images of a bygone era as they set off with a frenzied version of Link Wray’s “Rumble,” Depp, 12 acoustic strings in hand, adding lead vocals to the new “This is a Song for Miss Heady Lamarr”. ” Next.

Jacket and back to electric guitar, Depp grabbed the microphone with both hands, leaning into an early vocal on John Lennon’s “Isolation,” the duo’s debut single and a collective highlight on Sunday night.

With a quiet intro of “Time” by Dennis Wilson fully shouted by the surreal assembly, the duo headed for an encore with a psychedelic, instrumental version of the Beatles’ “A Day in the Life”, Depp on acoustics as Beck blasted through a series of electric solos, going from soft to loud, playing slower then faster, guitar in the air as he left the stage. Jimi Hendrix’s “Little Wing” was an encore shortly after.

Armed only with a harmonica and an acoustic guitar, singer-songwriter Desure captivated the sold-out crowd during the half-hour opening, starting with “Cocaine Smile” before posing. the harmonica for “Coming Down”.

Desure, who met Depp while working in a tattoo shop, performed an infectious cover of Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m on Fire” before moving on to “Kick Rocks” and new single “Threads.”

“I’ve been on the road with these guys for 14 dates. This is my last night,” Desure said onstage at the Chicago Theater. ‘is good.

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Bob McPeek dies and founds Mirror Image, Heartwood, Hyde & Zeke https://deimel.biz/bob-mcpeek-dies-and-founds-mirror-image-heartwood-hyde-zeke/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 15:34:55 +0000 https://deimel.biz/bob-mcpeek-dies-and-founds-mirror-image-heartwood-hyde-zeke/ “I’ve been looking for the melody since I started to sing He hides in the corner of a dream And if I try to solve its mystery and find its secret source He slips somewhere behind the scene” – Bob McPeek’s “Perfect Match” For Bob McPeek, it was always about plunging headfirst into this “secret […]]]>

“I’ve been looking for the melody since I started to sing

He hides in the corner of a dream

And if I try to solve its mystery and find its secret source

He slips somewhere behind the scene”

– Bob McPeek’s “Perfect Match”

For Bob McPeek, it was always about plunging headfirst into this “secret source”.

His relentless pursuit of the “mystery” of music led McPeek to play clubs in Ohio, decamp to Gainesville and open a record store, Hyde & Zeke, which became a favorite haunt for musicians and audiophiles.

McPeek went on to found Mirror Image and then Heartwood recording studios. A central figure in the Gainesville music scene for over 40 years, he has worked with some of the area’s top talent: Sister Hazel, Bo Diddley, Less than Jake, River Phoenix and others.

Singer-songwriter and producer Bob McPeek founded Mirror Image Recording Studio and was one of the founding partners of Heartwood Soundstage.

A record store entrepreneur, psychologist, sound engineer, songwriter, poet, musician and – above all – a perfectionist, McPeek died on Saturday after a long illness. He is only four days away from his 71st birthday.

“I am very reassured by the chance to have the love and respect of more people than I could have ever dreamed of,” McPeek wrote in his penultimate Facebook post. “And that late in life I had the opportunity to make music that brought me and others satisfaction.”

To his followers, he added that “you can’t do anything more meaningful to me than taking the time to listen and connect with the songs I’ve written. I hope they survive me.

His work can be viewed online at www.bobmcpeekmusic.com.

David Ottenberg and Bob McPeek perform at the Mirror Image 40th anniversary celebration in Gainesville in 2017.

McPeek helped audiences appreciate the music

McPeek played on the Columbus, Ohio club circuit in the 1970s before moving to Gainesville and starting Hyde & Zeke Records.

“The sign on our door said ‘No shirt, no shoes, no problem.’ Our motto was “Real People in a Plastic Company,” recalls his partner, Ric Kaestner, who played with McPeek in Columbus and then convinced him to move to “this cool college town” called Gainesville.

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Tap Dancer Pays Tribute to ‘Baby’ Laurence, Devin Allen Releases New Book, and Vincent De Paul Talks Versace – Baltimore Sun https://deimel.biz/tap-dancer-pays-tribute-to-baby-laurence-devin-allen-releases-new-book-and-vincent-de-paul-talks-versace-baltimore-sun/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 20:18:38 +0000 https://deimel.biz/tap-dancer-pays-tribute-to-baby-laurence-devin-allen-releases-new-book-and-vincent-de-paul-talks-versace-baltimore-sun/ This week, we’re “pressing” artist Brinae Ali, who is using grant money to dig deeper into the life of a Baltimore-born tap dancing legend. Go behind the scenes with a local native who works across the country as an actor and producer, but still maintains that there’s no place like home. Discover how a famous […]]]>

This week, we’re “pressing” artist Brinae Ali, who is using grant money to dig deeper into the life of a Baltimore-born tap dancing legend. Go behind the scenes with a local native who works across the country as an actor and producer, but still maintains that there’s no place like home. Discover how a famous photographer appropriates the work of a photography icon and relays the realities of social justice movements in his new book “No Justice, No Peace”.

While a native of Flint, Michigan, the Baltimore-based artist Brinae Ali continues to draw inspiration from Charm City and its gems.

“As a tap dancer, I’m excited in a space where one of my tap dancing icons is from…and Baby Laurence, he’s from Baltimore,” Ali, 40, said. “Being here, I’ve always had this determination to get closer to him, to find out some of the missing pieces of his life – his story.

Alongside his work as a member of the Billie Holiday Center for Liberation Arts and a member of the Baltimore Jazz Collective, Ali had previously worked on original projects to honor the late “Baby” Laurence Jacksonthe legendary Baltimore-born tap dancer who performed with the likes of Charlie Mingus and Count Basie.

Ali, who recently received a grant from the National Dance Project, said she plans to use the funding for the “Baby Laurence Legacy Project”. Its goal is to showcase the artist’s legacy through workshops and performances that will help residents understand a fellow Baltimore’s major contributions to dance and jazz.

“Baby Laurence himself was an advocate for jazz dance and culture, at a crucial time,” she said. “And he was definitely a bebop dancer… people don’t associate dancing with bebop and that kind of jazz music.”

As a teaching artist, Ali said she was inspired by Baby Laurence’s dream of creating an institute for students to learn the fundamentals, techniques and history of tap dancing, a goal that the legendary figure failed to achieve before dying of cancer at age 53.

“He certainly struggled and suffered…and it was at a time in his life where he was back, getting the attention and support of everyone who knew how awesome he was.”

Ali will perform at Jubilee Arts on November 11, where she plans to preview her Baby Laurence project.

Baltimore native and veteran actor Vincent De Paul.  (Photo by Antony Jones/Getty Images)

No matter where he goes, the Highlandtown-born actor and producer Vincent de Paul keeps Baltimore close.

“I’m detoxing from LA and all these other places in Baltimore and that really motivates me,” De Paul said. “I really like it here.”

De Paul, also known as his producer, Salvatore Vincent De Paul Zannino, has several new projects in the works, including one with local ties.

“Nothing’s Impossible,” a “feel good movie” about overcoming obstacles, is now streaming on PureFlix.com, De Paul said, noting that it was featured on the religious and family entertainment platform by a Towson University graduate and screenwriter. Timothy Ratajczak.

Her second project combines a love of fashion and cinema. De Paul, a former Versace model, produces a new documentary about artists who worked with the famous designer Gianni Versacekilled in 1997.

“The Genius of Gianni Versace Alive” is De Paul’s tribute to the designer, to whom he credits the impetus for his career. After a positive reception at Milan Fashion Week last month — and a reunion with Donatella VersaceGianni’s sister, at the Versace fashion show – De Paul said he plans to take the documentary to film festivals.

Upcoming projects include ‘The Chop Shop’, directed by a local filmmaker Irv Becker.

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“I’m very excited,” De Paul said. “This is a hair salon here in Maryland, and I love it because it’s local talent.”

Baltimore photographer Devin Allen posing after announcing a limited-edition clothing collection with Under Armor in 2021. Allen just released his new book

Devin AllenThe second book in “No Justice, No Peace: From the Civil Rights Movement to Black Lives Matter,” offers readers an intimate perspective on the struggle for justice through photos and stories.

The Baltimore photographer juxtaposes his work with that of the famous civil rights photographer Gordon Parkswhich captured American culture and race relations from the early 1940s to the 2000s. Parks’ work inspired Allen, whose “artivism” has graced the cover of TIME magazine and is featured in the Museum’s permanent collection of African-American History and Culture from the Smithsonian.

“[Parks] once said, “I took a camera because it was my choice of weapon against what I hated most in the universe: racism, intolerance, poverty. I didn’t know it at the time, but the camera would also be my choice of weapon,” Allen wrote in the introduction to his new book, out Oct. 11.

The photographer has spent the past seven years capturing Baltimore’s activism – from Freddie Gray at George Floyd and beyond. In 2017, Allen became the first Gordon Parks Foundation Fellow.

“I have since committed my photography and my art to solving problems in my community and raising the voices of the unknown,” he wrote.

With photos of Parks and Allen, ‘No Justice, No Peace’ features words from writers and activists, including a local author D. Watkins. The foreword is by the famous New York photographer Jamel Shabazz.

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