Guitar store – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 14:51:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://deimel.biz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Guitar store – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ 32 32 Guitarguitar: employee ownership finds the right note in the Scottish success story https://deimel.biz/guitarguitar-employee-ownership-finds-the-right-note-in-the-scottish-success-story/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 14:04:28 +0000 https://deimel.biz/guitarguitar-employee-ownership-finds-the-right-note-in-the-scottish-success-story/ A SCOTTISH guitar retailer has struck a chord with its staff by becoming the first musical instrument retailer in the country to go employee-owned. The guitar chain’s restructuring will see 60% of all its shares placed in an employee ownership trust (EOT), giving its 160-person team a majority of the business and its profits. The […]]]>

A SCOTTISH guitar retailer has struck a chord with its staff by becoming the first musical instrument retailer in the country to go employee-owned.

The guitar chain’s restructuring will see 60% of all its shares placed in an employee ownership trust (EOT), giving its 160-person team a majority of the business and its profits.

The online and in-store guitar retailer started in Corstorphine, Edinburgh in 2004 and has expanded to six locations across the UK.

It is now headquartered in Trongate in Glasgow and sells over 50,000 guitars a year – from entry level axes to highly sought after collectable instruments from the likes of Fender, Gibson, Taylor and Martin.

READ MORE: Buchanan Galleries: Center demolition plan for massive Glasgow street makeover

Kip McBay and Graham Bell, who co-founded the company, decide to move to an employee ownership model to allow them to plan their respective exits without threatening the brand’s heritage.

Bell said: “Our team is thrilled to find they now own a piece of this incredible business. The success of guitarguitar is the result of the commitment and hard work of our staff and we have now decided to take the next step and give them their own piece of the business.

“We have spent the past 20 years building a brand that we are passionate about. We wanted to make sure the business means something to future owners when it comes time to step back.

“Not only did we want to reward staff for their efforts within the business, but we also wanted to ensure that our customers will always be front and center. Every experience a customer has at guitarguitar will now be with someone who is invested and committed to providing exceptional service to musicians.

The company has an annual turnover of £45m and is the first musical instrument retailer in the UK to take the step towards employee share ownership, an increasingly popular business model.

Their operations manager, Bobby Simpson, said: “It’s been a fantastic day for the guitarguitar team.

“What a brilliant start to the year knowing that Kip and Graham have full confidence in every member of staff to continue and grow the guitarguitar legacy.”

Specialists in the field EY advised on the move and Douglas Roberts of Lindsays provided legal advice.

Roberts said: “guitarguitar is a brilliant Scottish business success story. Graham and Kip wanted to reward their staff and safeguard the future of the business while protecting the philosophy they have built.

READ MORE: Support for Scottish independence on the rise amid Boris Johnson chaos, pollster finds

Carole Leslie of Ownership Associates, who helped support the project, said: “This is a great milestone for the musical instrument retail industry and Ownership Associates has been pleased to help a such an important company within the industry to achieve its business objectives.

“We are seeing an abundance of interest in the structure of the company. When business owners like Kip and Graham want to set their own exit strategy, employee ownership quickly presents itself as a clear option to provide a positive path for owners and staff.

Bell added: “The last 20 years have been an exciting adventure for all of us when it comes to guitars. It’s time for Kip and I to let the next generation lead the company into the future.

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Suspect stole $8,000 guitar by hiding it in his pants, York-Toronto police say https://deimel.biz/suspect-stole-8000-guitar-by-hiding-it-in-his-pants-york-toronto-police-say/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 20:58:27 +0000 https://deimel.biz/suspect-stole-8000-guitar-by-hiding-it-in-his-pants-york-toronto-police-say/ York Regional Police said they were working to identify two suspects after a guitar worth around $8,000 was stolen from a Richmond Hill music store. Police said in a statement that officers were called to a store in the Leslie Street area south of Elgin Mills Road East on December 30 to reports of theft. […]]]>

York Regional Police said they were working to identify two suspects after a guitar worth around $8,000 was stolen from a Richmond Hill music store.

Police said in a statement that officers were called to a store in the Leslie Street area south of Elgin Mills Road East on December 30 to reports of theft.

The statement said the alleged theft took place ten days prior – on December 20 – when an unknown man entered the business and stole a guitar by hiding it in his pants. He then reportedly fled the area in a vehicle driven by a second suspect.

Police say the guitar is a Gibson Custom Shop 60th Anniversary ’59 Les Paul Standard, valued at approximately $8,000.

Read more:

York Police recover 50 stolen vehicles worth around $3million

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Officers released suspicious footage on Wednesday and called on anyone with information about the incident to contact them.

Surveillance video was also released appearing to show the suspect stuffing part of the guitar into his pants.

One of the suspects was described as a man in his twenties who wore “extremely wide baggy pants”, a Toronto Maple Leafs baseball cap and a black coat.

Police described the second suspect as a man in his 20s or 30s wearing a black mask, black hoodie and sunglasses.

Anyone with information is asked to contact investigators at 1-866-876-5423 ext. 7241 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-8477.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Woman caught stealing from Nashville store https://deimel.biz/woman-caught-stealing-from-nashville-store/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 04:47:05 +0000 https://deimel.biz/woman-caught-stealing-from-nashville-store/ NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – A business owner in East Nashville says a woman stole more than $500 in merchandise. The owner of Drum Supply House filmed the thief and said it was not the first time someone had stolen items from his store. Owner Andy Foote said Monday afternoon just after 1 p.m. a woman […]]]>

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – A business owner in East Nashville says a woman stole more than $500 in merchandise.

The owner of Drum Supply House filmed the thief and said it was not the first time someone had stolen items from his store.

Owner Andy Foote said Monday afternoon just after 1 p.m. a woman walked into the store claiming to need help finding a birthday present for her son.

“First she said drums, then she said guitar, which made me more suspicious,” Foote said. “Eventually she created distractions to get me to go over there and watch this to get me to turn my body, turns out she was putting things in her pants.”

After stealing a compact battery and some keyboard parts, the woman ran for the door.

“I chased her away yelling at her to let it go and stop,” Foote said.

The woman jumped into the getaway car, a black Nissan Rogue, which was positioned for a quick exit into the parking lot.

Foote said the woman stole approximately $550 worth of musical equipment.

The store owner has filed a police report and asks if you have any information on the suspect to call Metro Police.

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$ 4000 worth of stolen instruments from downtown Redmond art and music store https://deimel.biz/4000-worth-of-stolen-instruments-from-downtown-redmond-art-and-music-store/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 01:20:15 +0000 https://deimel.biz/4000-worth-of-stolen-instruments-from-downtown-redmond-art-and-music-store/ (Update: added video, owner comments) Three guitars, saxophone taken by thieves who smashed glass doors REDMOND, Ore. (KTVZ) – Art and Music in downtown Redmond on Southwest Fifth Street is a family owned business with a mission to inspire and teach creativity. You can buy art supplies, instruments, sign up for a painting class, or […]]]>

(Update: added video, owner comments)

Three guitars, saxophone taken by thieves who smashed glass doors

REDMOND, Ore. (KTVZ) – Art and Music in downtown Redmond on Southwest Fifth Street is a family owned business with a mission to inspire and teach creativity. You can buy art supplies, instruments, sign up for a painting class, or take guitar lessons. Terry Hurt, the owner, says the store has been open for about 2.5 years and was shocked when burglars hit this week.

Hurt received an alert at around 1:30 a.m. Tuesday that the store alarm was going off. When he arrived, the front door was smashed, as well as the door to the music room.

He explained on Wednesday that some guitars had been repelled and stolen.

However, it was not just any guitar that was taken.

“It’s a 1960 Gibson double cutaway, Les Paul custom special – big name,” Hurt said. “It’s just a fantastic guitar – it’s older, beautifully shaped, almost in perfect condition.”

“There’s probably one in Redmond, Oregon and the surrounding areas and that was it – yes, it’s a very unique and very special guitar,” he said.

Hurt says two more guitars and a saxophone were also missing.

He told NewsChannel 21 it was heartbreaking to see his store broken into, with broken glass everywhere.

Redmond Police are still investigating, but Hurt says based on security camera footage, the entire ordeal took just 18 seconds.

But during those 18 seconds, instruments valued at $ 4000 were taken and the two glass doors were smashed.

“We love what we do. We have ‘inspire’ in our windows, and that’s our goal – to inspire people with music and art,” Hurt said, “And so have one, you know, a bad guy is like – he’s a hit. “

“You fix the door and fix the other door, and you move on and just enjoy the awareness and love that we get from our community – you know we stand together,” he added.

The family set up a Linktree page to help raise funds to cover needed repairs.

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Obituary: Alan B. Burke – CentralMaine.com https://deimel.biz/obituary-alan-b-burke-centralmaine-com/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 06:01:01 +0000 https://deimel.biz/obituary-alan-b-burke-centralmaine-com/ Alan b burke SKOWHEGAN – On April 10, 1929, Alan B. Burke was born on the Burke family farm in Robbinston, Maine, overlooking Passamoquoddy Bay. His life on earth ended at home on December 9, 2021. He went to his Lord. Growing up on the farm he learned to take care of animals, spent time […]]]>

Alan b burke

SKOWHEGAN – On April 10, 1929, Alan B. Burke was born on the Burke family farm in Robbinston, Maine, overlooking Passamoquoddy Bay. His life on earth ended at home on December 9, 2021. He went to his Lord. Growing up on the farm he learned to take care of animals, spent time with his grandfather, Fred Burke, in the forge where his first job was to crank the forge fan and pass the nails with the blacksmith during the shoeing of the horses. He also spent time with his uncles, Percy and Leroy, in the woodworking shop, playing with and learning to use tools.

Alan walked to Robbinston Ridge one-room school for grades 1-6. Before going to school he could read, knew states and capitals, had a globe and maps. He skipped grade seven and had the same teacher in grade eight at the two-class school in Robbinston Village. He graduated from the Académie de Calais in 1946. He said: “I had my diploma in one hand and the writing work on the other”. He spoke with a recruiter in Calais. After reviewing his high school records, he was promised Army Air Corps schools, so he enlisted in the Army Air Corps for four years. As Alan had summer jobs scheduled, working in the sardine packing plant, raking blueberries and picking potatoes in Aroostook County, he was postponed until November. He spent the next 14 weeks in basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. For almost two years, he took courses (now the US Air Force) in radio mechanics and direction finding. He was assigned to the 1st Mobile Radio Squadron. From California, he made a day trip across the Pacific by General Sutton USNS to Yokohama, Japan, where he was stationed at Johnson Air Force Base, a former Japanese base used for suicide training for Kamikazes.

There, the Korean conflict began. Alan volunteered to join a detachment to go to Korea. He was in North Korea about 15 miles from the Yalu River on the Chinese border when they invaded. He and several others flew aboard a C47 loaded with kerosene drums for Pyongyang, then for South Korea. He remained there until his return to California to receive an honorable discharge on July 8, 1951. He was a proud veteran of having been able to serve his country.

On his return home, Alan bought land and cut logs to build a house on Robbinston Ridge with the same great view of Passamoquoddy Bay and St Andrews in New Brunswick, Canada. This place was his home until 1962. While he lived there, it belonged to the Lion’s Club, the Red Men and the Barn. He has served on the school committee and the board of directors.

In 1952, he married the love of his life, Harriet Stanhope, whom he had known all his life. They had three children, Dennis and Kevin born in Calais and Vernon in Waterville. Alan had several odd jobs before working at Todd’s Hardware in Calais. When Ted Williams (yes, the famous Red Sox baseball player) came to Maine to visit his boyfriend, Bud Leavitt, he shopped at Todd’s. He always asked Al to wait for him. Alan remembers selling him a gun and a fly fishing rod.

In 1955, New England Tel & Tel recruited. Alan had the skills they were looking for. His first job was to set up telephone offices across Maine and Massachusetts. In 1962, he moved to technical maintenance of the central office of the Skowhegan telephone office. He studied, took oral exams all day and became a leading consultant technician responsible for all toll services in Somerset County. Alan replaced the supervisors during the holidays. He was offered supervisory positions on several occasions, but declined because he did not want to take personal time with his family. A coworker in another office said he would have a problem he couldn’t solve, but knew who to call, “Al always had the answer.” Alain retired in 1989.

Alan grew up in a family of musicians. He earned money by picking beans to buy a guitar and a bicycle. He learned to play the guitar and sang at public events. He also played the saxophone in the Stanhope Orchestra for the dances. After learning square dancing, he studied, taught and called dancers for the Arnold Trail Squares and several other clubs for many years. Alan and Harriet also taught ballroom dancing. He was a member of the Northeast Square Dance Callers and the Teachers Association. He continued with the Lions Club, working on many projects like the Skowhegan Fair for as long as he could, a member of the American Legion for 54 years, Telephone Pioneers and Skowhegan Federated Church where he served on many committees of church and as co-chair of the addition of the Sunday School and the renovation of Tewksbury Hall.

When Alan’s boys got involved with the Boy Scouts, so did he. Alan was a Cub master for troop 485, 10 years old. At a fall camporee in Jackman, he always said that “frying bacon for breakfast in a snowstorm was a lot of fun”. He has always been proud of his boy’s accomplishments, two were first class scouts and Vernon is an Eagle Scout.

Alan enjoyed family reunions, Lake Wesserunsett Camp, boating, water skiing, deep sea fishing off Eastport, gardening, woodworking, music and travel. He and Harriet visited Ireland (birthplace of his great-grandfather, Michael Burke), Hawaii, Alaska, Washington DC, Florida, many national parks and historic sites in the United States and Canada. .

Alan’s natural sense of humor and caring personality have made him a beloved presence in many lives. She was an exceptional person whom many were honored to have known. He was loved, admired and respected by all, and he will be dearly missed and never forgotten.

He will be remembered by his wife Harriet for almost 70 years; the children, the Rev. Dr. Denise Sudbeck, Aimee of Anchorage, Alaska, Vernon Burke of Skowhegan; grandchildren, Julie, Danielle, Nathan and Ellis; seven great-grandchildren; niece, Suzanne; nephews, Alan, Rick, Mike and David; Richard and Jessie Stanhope, Jean Stanhope, Anne Rider; and his cousins ​​in Ohio; friends like family, Kenneth and Jane Brooks and those who called him Grampie. He was predeceased by his son Kevin and his mother Marion.

Alan and Harriet were fortunate to have the assistance of various caregivers during her illness and her final days. Special thanks to ALL for their support, allowing him to stay at home.

A funeral service with military honors will be held on Saturday, June 18, 2022 at 11 a.m. at Robbinston Ridge Cemetery.

Arrangements under the direction and care of Dan & Scott’s Cremation & Funeral Service, 445 Waterville Road, Skowhegan ME 04976.

Please consider making donations in his memory to House in the Woods, 217 Skunk Hill Road, Lee, ME 04455, e-mail: http://www.houseinthewoods.org

Alan b burke

Golden Book

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Partial to Home: On the Road with The Pre-Dawn Five https://deimel.biz/partial-to-home-on-the-road-with-the-pre-dawn-five/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 07:31:27 +0000 https://deimel.biz/partial-to-home-on-the-road-with-the-pre-dawn-five/ Birney imes VSraddock Boyd is in a chatty mood this afternoon. His friend Ray McIntyre brought a box of Popeyes chicken and they just finished lunch. Outside, on this freezing Thursday, the temperature is plummeting. He should dive into the 20s overnight. Purring gas heaters throughout the elevated South Second Street cottage keep the place […]]]>
Birney imes

VSraddock Boyd is in a chatty mood this afternoon.

His friend Ray McIntyre brought a box of Popeyes chicken and they just finished lunch.

Outside, on this freezing Thursday, the temperature is plummeting. He should dive into the 20s overnight.

Purring gas heaters throughout the elevated South Second Street cottage keep the place warm and cozy. The house belonged to Boyd’s grandparents. He has lived here since childhood.

Boyd moved to town after contracting polio while entering sophomore in New Hope.

“It was just before the sugar cubes,” he said, referring to the vaccines given to each schoolboy.

After one of his many surgeries, he could only blink.

Another time, doctors told his parents that if their son stayed overnight, he would live.

“I cheated on them,” Boyd said.

For a short while he was able to move around on crutches. Boyd, 78, has been confined to a wheelchair since elementary school.

Hoping it would be a welcome distraction, her mother suggested piano lessons. It lasted about a year.

“I hated training,” Boyd said. “The kids were playing outside and I was practicing.”

The next time he was introduced to a musical instrument, it was his last year in high school. He wanted to play the music he heard on the radio. He bought a guitar.

Boyd’s first semester at Mississippi State as a history student didn’t go well. He transferred to East Mississippi Junior College in Scooba.

While at Scooba, his classmate Hudson Adams heard him play guitar and asked if he wanted to play bass in a band he was forming.

The unnamed group performed a few concerts in the neighboring Meridian.

Then, one morning at dawn, as the band drove to Columbus after a concert in Meridian, drummer Perry Barker had a flash of inspiration.

“I was thinking of The Dawn Breakers,” said Barker, a former piano tuner who owns a music store in Tupelo.

“Here is the sun,” Boyd recalls, telling Barker. “The Pre-Dawn Five is coming home.”

A group was born. The group included Boyd, Barker, Adams, Don Mosley, Clayton Gilliam and Gene Holmes.

The band picked up popular pop music at the time, from high school standards like “Ebb Tide”, “Misty” and “I Feel Good” by James Brown.

In the summer of 63 or 64, the group performed at the Gus Stevens Buccaneer Lounge, a popular Biloxi supper club. Boyd remembers the first part of Johnny Rivers.

Shortly after, Gene Holmes left for California where he became a studio musician. The group disbanded soon after.

Boyd’s days as a rocker seemed to be over. He focused on his studies and eventually accepted a job as a designer at Ceco Building Systems where he worked for 27 years.

In the mid-1960s, Mickey Guyton, lead singer of The Blades of Grass, persuaded Boyd to replace Dean Swartz during the bassist’s period of service in Vietnam. Boyd joined Guyton, Carl Edwards, Steve O’Callaghan and Reed Smith during Swartz’s absence.

In the early 1970s, Boyd received a phone call from Johnny Coleman who wanted to know if he could attend a concert that night. The two musicians liked each other, and Coleman asked Boyd to join him in a band he was forming, Podunk.

The group, made up of Coleman, Boyd, Art Christopher, Mahlon Vickery and Steve O’Callaghan, are said to be the house band of Southernaire, a honky tonk on what is now The Island.

The Aire, as it was commonly called, was renowned for its lively clientele. Fistfights on the dance floor or outside in the gravel parking lot were not uncommon.

“I was scared to death the first time we played Southernaire,” Boyd said.

This arrangement came to an abrupt end in 1975 when a newly elected sheriff established roadblocks on the Tombigbee River Bridge, Boyd said.

“We got the door (cover) and they (the club) got the beer sales,” he said. When they stopped coming, we couldn’t make any money.

Aside from a few damaged snapshots, Boyd has only one tangible relic from his days as a group.

Podunk trained on Monday evenings. Coleman, a biology professor at Columbus High, would bring a large reel tape recorder and a single mic to record and critique the band’s workouts.

Boyd made a CD of one of those sessions.

Every now and then, he grabs one of the remote controls that clutter his bed and presses “play” on the one that controls his CD player.

“I listen to it to bring old memories back to life,” he said.

As for all those long nights playing for teenagers in drab high school gyms, National Guard armories, and American Legion huts, Boyd has fond memories.

“Overall I loved it,” he said.

Birney Imes ([email protected]) is the former publisher of The Dispatch.

Birney Imes III is the outgoing editor of The Dispatch.


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DJ Ashba – I played rhythm guitar on Motley Crue’s 2008 album https://deimel.biz/dj-ashba-i-played-rhythm-guitar-on-motley-crues-2008-album/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 17:26:50 +0000 https://deimel.biz/dj-ashba-i-played-rhythm-guitar-on-motley-crues-2008-album/ Former Guns N ‘Roses member and founder of Sixx: AM, guitarist DJ Ashba, has said he plays rhythm guitar on Motley Crue’s Los Angeles Saints. Admission took place Jan. 5 during an interview with the musician on Sirius XM Nation trunk, the show hosted by rock radio personality Eddie Trunk. During their conversation, discussions turned […]]]>

Former Guns N ‘Roses member and founder of Sixx: AM, guitarist DJ Ashba, has said he plays rhythm guitar on Motley Crue’s Los Angeles Saints.

Admission took place Jan. 5 during an interview with the musician on Sirius XM Nation trunk, the show hosted by rock radio personality Eddie Trunk. During their conversation, discussions turned to Ashba’s contributions as a session player, often without credit.

“Motley,” the guitarist added, referring to the 2008 album Crue, when Trunk asked him about his past session work, including those so-called “ghost” sessions played uncredited for other artists.

“I played all the beats on it,” Ashba added of Los Angeles Saints, as reported by Blabbermouth. “Corn [Motley Crue guitarist] Mick [Mars] was great. Mick was actually in the hospital at the time. “

Los Angeles Saints was Motley Crue’s debut album with their original lineup in the decade since 1997 Pig generation. But in the album’s cover notes, Ashba is listed as a co-producer alongside Crue bassist and Sixx frontman: AM Nikki Sixx, as well as an additional engineer, with no mention of other contributions.

In the same Trunk interview, Ashba – who joined Guns N ‘Roses as a guitarist in 2009 but left the band before founding the GNR Slash guitarist’s comeback in 2016 – was asked if he had ever submitted original material to Guns N ‘Roses for review by singer Axl Rose.

“I tried,” Ashba said. “By nature, I’m a songwriter-producer, so of course I’m going to keep writing.”

The musician, who will turn 50 later this year, estimated that he had written “from eight to ten [songs] with Guns in mind, but a lot of them were too Appetite [for Destruction] survey.”

Ashba has also worked with rock groups such as Drowning Pool, Beautiful Creatures, and BulletBoys. He has also supported singers like Neil Diamond, Marion Raven and Aimee Allen. Sixx: AM, which he formed with Sixx in 2007, is now on an indefinite hiatus.

Motley Crue plans to mount its twice postponed stadium tour this summer. Singer Vince Neil recently returned to the stage after falling and breaking his ribs during a solo performance. Crue recently sold the rights to his song catalog for $ 150 million.

Most Anticipated Rock + Metal Albums of 2022

What should be on your radar for 2022.


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Avett Brothers Musical “Swept Away” On Track for Berkeley Rep Premiere https://deimel.biz/avett-brothers-musical-swept-away-on-track-for-berkeley-rep-premiere/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 16:52:32 +0000 https://deimel.biz/avett-brothers-musical-swept-away-on-track-for-berkeley-rep-premiere/ David Neumann (center), the choreographer of “Swept Away,” rehearses with the cast members in Berkeley. “Swept Away” will feature music by the Avett brothers and will be directed by Tony Award winner Michael Mayer. Photo: Nina Riggio / The Chronicle The Berkeley Repertory Theater is finally considering raise the curtain on the world premiere of […]]]>
David Neumann (center), the choreographer of “Swept Away,” rehearses with the cast members in Berkeley. “Swept Away” will feature music by the Avett brothers and will be directed by Tony Award winner Michael Mayer. Photo: Nina Riggio / The Chronicle

The Berkeley Repertory Theater is finally considering raise the curtain on the world premiere of the Avett brothers-inspired musical “Swept Away” on Sunday, January 9, after more than a year of pandemic delay.

The good news? Demand for tickets is so high that the show has already extended its airing twice, with the intention of occupying the company’s Peet’s Theater until March 6.

The bad news? Well, just check out the headlines.

During rehearsals the first week of December, the production’s Tony Award-winning director Michael Mayer said, “We’ve crossed all of our numbers.”

As the highly mutated omicron variant of the coronavirus gained traction across New York City and shut down Broadway shows – including Mayer’s revival of “Little Shop of Horrors” at the Westside Theater after an actor tested positive for COVID -19 – the director said he still feels optimistic about the opening date of “Swept away.” But if he’s learned anything from the past two years, it’s to be flexible.

“The ‘show must go on’ theory is toned down a bit at this point,” Mayer said. “The show must go on, but maybe not tonight.”

With the help of choreographer David Neumann (center), the cast of “Swept Away” rehearse in Berkeley. Photo: Nina Riggio / The Chronicle

“Swept Away” was originally scheduled to premiere at Berkeley Rep in June 2020, with a screenplay by another Tony winner John Logan and a sheet music from the Avett Brothers catalog, in particular the 2004 LP of the North Carolina folk-rock group, “Mignonette”.

“For me, this is an opportunity for musical theater fans to be introduced to or deepen their appreciation for the work of the Avett Brothers,” said Mayer. “It’s also an opportunity for their fans to come and listen to these songs in a new context, sung in a different way, and in relation to other characters.”

Mayer has some experience in bringing popular music to theatrical stages. Ten years ago, he directed and directed Green Day’s “American Idiot” musical. Angry thumb.

The idea for a drama built around the music and lyrics of the Avett brothers was brought to him by screenwriter John Logan, whose Broadway production of a “Moulin Rouge!” The musical was also mired in COVID protocols.

“What impressed me the most about the music of the Avett Brothers is the range, from toe-clapping banjo music to soaring spirituals to intimate love songs,” Logan said. “It gave me the widest range of colors. The process of going through it and choosing the songs was arduous, but it was joyful. “

Taurean Prince Everett, a “Swept Away” actor, rehearses in Berkeley. Photo: Nina Riggio / The Chronicle

The new musical is set in 1888 and follows a crew of four castaways, including two brothers, who try to survive off New Bedford, Mass.

The production stars John Gallagher Jr., Stark Sands, Wayne Duvall and Adrian Blake Enscoe, with choreography by David Neumann. It lasts a little over 75 minutes, without an intermission.

“When you’re dealing with starving people in a lifeboat, you can’t send people out for a hot dog and a margarita,” Logan said. “It’s not a light show. There aren’t a lot of tap dancing. It’s the anti-Moulin Rouge! “

The story resonated with the Avett brothers as well.

“There are many times that I am up there where I embody this companion going through an evolution in life, of love and pain and joy and suffering,” Scott Avett told The Chronicle. by phone, calling from his home in North Carolina. “Obviously Broadway takes the magnifying glass and puts it up close. I am so moved to see it build.

Members of the cast of “Swept Away” rehearse in Berkeley. Photo: Nina Riggio / The Chronicle

Even though he started writing “Swept Away” in 2017, Logan said experiencing the COVID-19 pandemic only deepened his context.

“For all its intensity, it’s a story of redemption and finding grace in really difficult circumstances,” he said. “If anything, what we’re going through is finding favor under impossible circumstances. It’s the perfect show at the moment.

Mayer said there is already widespread interest, both in the world of musical theater and indie rock, with tickets being purchased from people in 42 states.

And, he noted, none of the fans will be disappointed.

“John really placed the songs with extraordinary care and a deep understanding of them,” Mayer said. “They are never reserved spaces. In those jukebox musicals, it can sometimes seem random. It is not like that. It positions them so that you can really hear them.

Scott (left) and Seth Avett of the Avett Brothers perform in 2018 in Charlotte, NC Photo credit: Jeff Hahne / Getty Images

The Avett brothers were more than willing to see their work in a new creative context and even recorded a new version of the title song, “Swept Away ”, with siblings Scott and Seth Avett on banjo and acoustic guitar and teammate Bob Crawford on double bass. A video of the song was shot for Berkeley Rep’s Ovation Gala.

“When we were discussing anything with the writers, cast and crew, it was obvious that it was in the hands of a group that wouldn’t let anything come out less than excellent – and I do watch out for that word, ”Avett said. “As an artist, this is probably the ultimate compliment and the ultimate praise for our work.”

For Logan, the approval of the project by the Avett brothers was the one that really mattered.

“It could have been a very short reunion,” he said, “but one of the things that got them most excited was that other artists were taking inspiration from their work and presenting it to a new audience. . “

“Swept”: Musical. From January 9 to March 6. From $ 37 to $ 186, subject to change Berkeley Repertory Theater, 2025 Addison St., Berkeley. 510-647-2949. www.berkeleyrep.org



  • Aidin Vaziri
    Aidin Vaziri is the pop music critic for the San Francisco Chronicle. Email: avaziri@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @MusicSF


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Ruth Wyand pioneer with words on First Fridays on stage https://deimel.biz/ruth-wyand-pioneer-with-words-on-first-fridays-on-stage/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 20:57:56 +0000 https://deimel.biz/ruth-wyand-pioneer-with-words-on-first-fridays-on-stage/ GREENVILLE, NC (WNCT) – Kill Devil Hills musician Ruth Wyand is a pioneering singer and songwriter who utilizes a melting pot of styles primarily incorporating fingerpicking and bottleneck into her original work. She is an insightful storyteller who tells relevant stories with excellent guitar playing and authentic lyrics listeners can’t help but stomp their feet […]]]>

GREENVILLE, NC (WNCT) – Kill Devil Hills musician Ruth Wyand is a pioneering singer and songwriter who utilizes a melting pot of styles primarily incorporating fingerpicking and bottleneck into her original work.

She is an insightful storyteller who tells relevant stories with excellent guitar playing and authentic lyrics listeners can’t help but stomp their feet on. Wyand has performed everywhere, from bars to theaters influenced by some of the best music contributors from Rosetta Tharpe, Nina Simone, Billie Holiday to Doc Watson.

Wyand’s sound is hers, and she’ll tell you that it was 100 years ago when she first became a musician.

With his great sense of humor comes an electrifying eclectic style from different genres. In her words, the Paranoia Street singer shares with us the music that has influenced her sound. As you listen to this conversation, you will hear his heart on the strings of the guitar.

So, can you tell us about your background and how you became a musician?

“Well, that was about 100 years ago. Now I started playing when I was in elementary school and there was a program that gave the school instruments. A music store. local gave the school some instruments and at that point I got a flute to play, the boys got the guitars and the girls got the flutes and clarinets. So eventually I ended up buy a guitar and I started taking lessons and you know I kept going all the way.

“I have just experimented with so many genres of music, different styles of American music all my life. I started out very interested in jazz and blues and all kinds of roots music that I love. I call myself an orange haired musicologist because I enjoy reading biographies and biographies of musicians, especially women musicians, jazz and blues. You know, I just try to read so much history about our own musical heritage or do you know our American music that I love, then you know I try to play as much as I can.

Is there a blues musician that you absolutely love and Is there one that particularly marked you?

“Yes, mainly Matthis Minnie and Sister Rosetta Tharpe have been major influences on me on my playing and their life stories and I love their music.”

So every song you perform, do you write all of your music?

“I write, perform traditional blues and jazz songs and, you know, I kind of throw the gimmick that you probably know about 70% of the original songs, and then I throw a few covers.”

Is there one of your favorite songs that sounds like your favorite musician’s time that you love to play?

“There is a song that I love to sing and I try to open my shows with it because it’s a good warm-up on guitar and a good vocal warm-up for me. It’s “nobody’s fault other than mine”, it’s one of those who make it all go wrong. I know Nina Simone sang so many people sang it, but the one that is close to my heart is the one that Nina Simone has. “

How do you write your songs?

“Well, I usually write a guitar part first and then the lyrics come later. I mean, it’s probably about 95% of the way I write, it’s very rare that I have a topic I want to write about because it comes to me musically rather than you know I’m not going walk down the street and say i want to write a song about you know a store or something i just said, it comes to me musically rather than a story and then usually the story comes from the music, be it whatever thing that brings back a memory and then you know it becomes history.

How would you describe your style and define a melting pot of styles? and What is your guitar playing style?

“Well, there’s a style called Piedmont Picking that’s uh the thumb type of style where the thumb makes a base and then your picking with your hand with your other fingers and so it’s a cross kind like piedmont. blues picking and there’s sort of a banjo style called a claw hammer. It’s old, I wouldn’t say it’s an old bluegrass technique but bluegrass has its opposite but it’s an old banjo technique so I incorporate Piedmont picking with the banjo claw hammer and I play too bottleneck slide guitar with the slide that’s a bottleneck. “

Do you tune your instruments according to what you are preparing to play at the time?

“Yeah, and sometimes it’s pretty handy for you, like I’m doing a show and my husband can come with me, I can bring 3, 4, or 5 guitars with me so I can have them all.” preset so I don’t have to be on stage and tune. But, if I’m on my own I can usually take 2 or 3, maybe it depends on the venue, but I’m still tuning because you know I probably go through about 8 tunings in a show.


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Alex Johnson Hotel Hosts Annual New Year’s Party https://deimel.biz/alex-johnson-hotel-hosts-annual-new-years-party/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 03:30:03 +0000 https://deimel.biz/alex-johnson-hotel-hosts-annual-new-years-party/ RAPID CITY, SD – With New Years Eve comes a night of fun for the Rapid City area, like the Alex Johnson Hotel. Returning this year is their annual event complete with their annual Ball Drop, with thousands of people expected at Sixth Street for the show. A blanket fee of $ 25 will get […]]]>

RAPID CITY, SD – With New Years Eve comes a night of fun for the Rapid City area, like the Alex Johnson Hotel.

Returning this year is their annual event complete with their annual Ball Drop, with thousands of people expected at Sixth Street for the show.

A blanket fee of $ 25 will get you access to the festivities, including prizes and cash gifts

“So if you want to get down to downtown Rapid City, there’s going to be a lot going on,” hotel manager Billi de Rudder said. “At midnight we will do the bullet drop, which is quite famous for this area. We’ve got Flannel playing in the ballroom, we’ll have a DJ in the lobby here, and we’ll have acoustic guitar in The Vertex. So whatever your level is, it should be a great time here.

Hotel managers also have fun surprises and new additions to the party.

“We also have a new band, our new acoustic guitarists that we’ve never had before. A group that will be at Vertex, we are really looking forward to them. One of them may or may not be an employee of the Alex Johnson hotel, so we are delighted for him and his group, ”Billi added. “But we have a lot to do. We will have a champagne theme this year. So there will be a few different champagne tours around the hotel, and we’ve never done that before either. So we are delighted to have everyone downtown and to stay warm inside the hotel.

The event inside the hotel begins at 9 p.m. on New Years Eve.


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