Guitar store – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 09:08:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deimel.biz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Guitar store – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ 32 32 Art takes over downtown Gardiner on August 19 https://deimel.biz/art-takes-over-downtown-gardiner-on-august-19/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 05:40:53 +0000 https://deimel.biz/art-takes-over-downtown-gardiner-on-august-19/ Artwalk Gardiner will continue into its 16th year from 5-8:30 p.m. on Friday, August 19 at artists’ studios, galleries, shops and other venues in historic downtown Gardiner. The free event will showcase unique artworks ranging from painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics, handmade books, jewelry, textiles, chain stitching, carpentry and carving. First launched in 2005 by Artdogs […]]]>

Artwalk Gardiner will continue into its 16th year from 5-8:30 p.m. on Friday, August 19 at artists’ studios, galleries, shops and other venues in historic downtown Gardiner. The free event will showcase unique artworks ranging from painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics, handmade books, jewelry, textiles, chain stitching, carpentry and carving.

First launched in 2005 by Artdogs Studios and a handful of other area artists, the event’s mission is to raise community awareness and appreciation of the visual arts, to encourage interaction and familiarity between local artists and the general public, to provide artists with a network of support, and to foster the creative economy through regular art exhibitions and events in historic downtown Gardiner.

Featured artists showing their work include Karen Adrienne, Artdogs, Alan Claude Studio, Kat Buehner, John Carnes, Cattywampus Studio, Emma Christman, Circling The Square Fine Art Press, Amanda Clark, Costell & Costell Gallery, Susan Curley, Matt Demers and Allison McKeen Studio, Ross Dener, Mike Gent, Katrina Henderson, Pamela Heatherly, Danae Lagoy, Judith Long, Margaret Melanson Pottery, Scott Minzy, Luke Myers, Purple Shed Woodworks, Ellen Roberts, Kaitlin Thibeau, Joselyn Walsh and Terry Wilson. Their work will be featured at many downtown businesses including Gardiner 4Twenty, Gardiner Hardware, Gold Finch Creamery, Monkitree, Niche, Inc., Spoke Coffee, Table Bar, and The Healing Community Med Co. Special thanks to all ARTWALK GARDINER sponsors: 1 Brunswick Trading, Eddie Dugay, Andy Molloy, ME Rental Properties LLC, Reny’s and Jennifer Strode.

Dave Lawlor will play jazz guitar music throughout the evening and there will be an Exquisite Corpse drawing game from the ARTWALK community.

For more information send an e-mail [email protected]or visit the events facebook page.

Check out other upcoming entertainment events!

” Previous

]]>
The day the music died? Welcome to the new ‘digital streetscape’ of Denmark Street and Tottenham Court Road | Architecture https://deimel.biz/the-day-the-music-died-welcome-to-the-new-digital-streetscape-of-denmark-street-and-tottenham-court-road-architecture/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/the-day-the-music-died-welcome-to-the-new-digital-streetscape-of-denmark-street-and-tottenham-court-road-architecture/ OOnce upon a time, just outside Soho in central London, there was a legendary beehive of musical energy. It was centered on Denmark Street – Britain’s Tin Pan Alley – a strip of shops selling instruments and sheet music, with clubs and bars and things like production facilities and agents’ and directors’ offices upstairs superiors, […]]]>

OOnce upon a time, just outside Soho in central London, there was a legendary beehive of musical energy. It was centered on Denmark Street – Britain’s Tin Pan Alley – a strip of shops selling instruments and sheet music, with clubs and bars and things like production facilities and agents’ and directors’ offices upstairs superiors, where new-in-town fans and budding musicians could mingle with the stars. Everything related to music – writing, producing, playing, listening, selling – could be done in its short duration.

An almost endless call from big names has made music there: Lionel Bart, the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Elton John, George Michael, the Libertines, Adele, Ed Sheeran. Young David Bowie, desperate to be on the street where it happened, camped there in a converted ambulance. The Sex Pistols launched their career from an apartment in Denmark Street. Just across Charing Cross Road, in Soho proper, was the London Astoria, a venue big enough for 2,000 people.

Several hundred million pounds of construction later, there is still a street of musical instrument shops, along with new production premises and facilities, as well as a “radical department of marketing, entertainment and new technology-driven information, housed in a super-flexible, digitally-enabled streetscape,” and much more. There will be “busking points” and clubs. The Astoria is gone, but a new 600-seat theater called @sohoplace is on the way, at a site next to where it was.

On paper, therefore, its mix of uses resembles that of the past, but in spirit it is completely changed. It is built on the obvious paradox that a culture fueled by rebellion and chaos should now be channeled through the processes of big landlords. Anarchy in the UK, this is not the case. Or rather, it’s a new kind of large-scale anarchy, where the boys making all the noise are big business.

The catalyst for this extravaganza is the Elizabeth Line, the £18.9billion supersized and fast-track Tube that opened last May, whose Tottenham Court Road station can disgorge 200,000 passengers a day. Its construction required the demolition of the Astoria and other buildings, clearing the site for new development. It brings throngs of would-be punters to the doorstep of new venue areas, which will power Outernet London, a billion-pound ‘immersive entertainment district’, ‘where music, film, art, games and retail experiences come to life in breathtaking new ways.”

This “district” is in fact a unique project, although incorporating some historical fragments, owned by a single company, Consolidated Developments. Its most notable feature is the Now Building, a large oblong block that greets you as you step out of the tube: a giant table-like frame clad in black stone, inside which tiered golden shutters can fold down to reveal an atrium lined with 23,000 square feet of floor-to-ceiling high-resolution LED screens. Other spaces in the complex also surround visitors with screens. You’ll be greeted by a storm of digital light and movement in what Consolidated will call “London’s Times Square.”

The Now Building’s golden shutters fold back to reveal a space lined with giant floor-to-ceiling LED screens. External network

Beneath the Now Building is a new 2,000-seat venue, Here at Outernet, which will open in September. Behind it is Castle Denmark, a hotel ‘inspired by the rare bustle of Denmark Street’, where for £456 a night and up you can stay like a rock star in ornate ‘session rooms’ mahogany and burgundy velvet and “antiques”. brass” and “industrial concrete”, pre-vandalized with organized graffiti. And on the south side of the same block is Denmark Street itself, where the old guitar shops – partly thanks to the encouragement of Camden Council – have been invited to carry on business in its refurbished buildings, as well than a “popular music venue”. formed in the former 12 Bar Club.

Outernet CEO Philip O’Ferrall calls his project “the world’s largest and most advanced content atrium…an atomized and disruptive brand engagement platform,” meaning companies will pay generously to put their mark on the big videos and to hold spectacular events in the screened rooms. The idea is to attract the public and make them linger, with the images on the screens, with the music, with the bars and restaurants, so that they can be exposed to more sales. “If you spend another 30 seconds in my area, I can offer you more advertising,” he says. The revenue, O’Ferrall also says, will help fund the less profitable music businesses across the block.

The architecture, by longtime firm Orms, which previously transformed Camden council offices into the elegant Standard Hotel, is by turns loud and tidy. There’s the big gold and black block stuff, a bit of an art deco inspiration. There are preserved historic facades, gently ornamental affairs of brick and stucco and stone trim. Inside the block there is a version of traditional London backyard construction, a patchwork of glazed bricks and industrial-looking windows. The larger context, outside the site boundaries, plays even more tunes: the zigzagging concrete of the 1960s Center Point skyscraper, a pink and black flower-patterned building nearing completion on which was part of Foyle’s bookstore.

Castle Denmark
“Strong accents of punk rock,” says the public relations spiel for Chateau Denmark, a hotel inspired by “the rare street bustle of Denmark.” External network

It doesn’t take much effort to tie everything together. You get your small-scale Victorian ornament and domestic Georgian throwbacks, and then you get your full blast of the 21st century high-tech marketing and entertainment complex. This omnivorous eclecticism – an all-you-can-eat buffet of looks, styles and amenities – is the spirit of the entire Outernet enterprise, from hotel rooms to big screens to curated boutiques. You feel it as soon as you step out of the tube station, at the junction of Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road, and are confronted with a digital installation that shifts from cloudscapes meant to achieve an “immersive experience of mindfulness and relaxation” to something about Unicef ​​to a roar of The Clash music, a dizzying ride from calm to awareness for battle rock.

To which one could say: great. Isn’t it fundamental to a city like London, and in particular Soho and its environs, that it be a place of contrasts, a rich palimpsest of aspiration and creation that manifests itself in its built fabric? And isn’t it also great that the neighborhood’s musical heritage has found a new and clearly well-funded form? That hundreds of thousands of people will have a great time here and artists will have the chance to make and perform music?

Wall art in the Outernet.
Wall art at Outernet London. Photography: Tim Soar

Surely it’s better that it’s all here, and that the guitar shops are kept, that it’s all swept away by a gigantic office building. If that’s brash, then so were the Victorian music halls and cinemas of the 1930s, which are now much-loved heritage items. (And, in fact, if you go too far, you might have a little more fun than those black frames.) But no one should be under any illusions that this looks a lot like the Tin Pan Alley of yore. Because what was once multiple and spontaneous is now under the control of Consolidated Properties and Outernet. The thing called “neighborhood” is a single-owner real estate proposition. What would happen to a Bowie now if he tried to kip in his ambulance? Or a Johnny Rotten with a spray can? Or someone who wants to busk in an unapproved way?

The project comes with virtuoso PR gibberish that robs the sentences of basic meaning. The hotel, apparently, “brings together creative expression and fine architectural detail to present something fierce”. Its rooms have “strong punk rock accents” and “a rebellious statement piece.” But how “rebellious” can anything be on this site, when it is co-opted to sell cars, software and fashion?

The result is not Tin Pan Alley, but something resembling what it would look like if it were rebuilt by alien archaeologists, with the help of some wonky artificial intelligence. Maybe that’s the way the world is – and modern methods or music production mean that places like Denmark Street can in no way be what they used to be – and we should gratefully accept what is to us given. But that’s not really what cities or music are for.

]]>
Fender lays off hundreds of employees https://deimel.biz/fender-lays-off-hundreds-of-employees/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 17:19:23 +0000 https://deimel.biz/fender-lays-off-hundreds-of-employees/ Meanwhile, Bloomberg News reported that Apple plans to slow growth in hiring and spending next year. Google told employees it would “slow the pace of hiring for the remainder of the year,” according to an internal memo from CEO Sundar Pichai obtained by The Verge. Pichai said the Mountain View, Calif.-based company isn’t freezing hiring […]]]>

Meanwhile, Bloomberg News reported that Apple plans to slow growth in hiring and spending next year. Google told employees it would “slow the pace of hiring for the remainder of the year,” according to an internal memo from CEO Sundar Pichai obtained by The Verge. Pichai said the Mountain View, Calif.-based company isn’t freezing hiring entirely; it will still hire for “engineering, technical and other critical roles.” But stepping back will mean “pausing development and redeploying resources to higher priority areas,” according to the memo.

The memo came on the heels of Meta, formerly known as Facebook, giving engineering managers a deadline to identify anyone on their team who “needs support” and flag them in an internal HR system, reported The Information. “If a direct report is coasting or performing poorly, we don’t need them; they are dropping this company,” wrote Maher Saba, the company’s engineering manager. “As a manager, you can’t allow someone to be net neutral or negative for Meta.”

Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg told employees on a company-wide call last month that not everyone was meeting standards at the Menlo Park, Calif.-based company. and that some may want to leave voluntarily, Reuters reported. Zuckerberg added that the company plans to cut plans to hire engineers by at least 30% this year.

“If I had to bet, I’d say this could be one of the worst downturns we’ve seen in recent history,” Zuckerberg said. “In reality, there’s probably a bunch of people in the business who shouldn’t be here.”

Over the past two months, JPMorgan Chase & Co., the largest bank in the United States, and Coinbase, the nation’s largest cryptocurrency exchange, have both laid off hundreds of employees. Streaming giant Netflix followed suit, announcing its second round of cuts in two months. Tesla went even further by closing its factory based in San Mateo, Calif., laying off hundreds of people in the process. As the housing, crypto and tech markets all face upheaval, more companies are expected to downsize in the coming months.

]]>
Owner Channels Top Vibes Running Positively Fourth Street in Downtown Santa Rosa https://deimel.biz/owner-channels-top-vibes-running-positively-fourth-street-in-downtown-santa-rosa/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 23:34:41 +0000 https://deimel.biz/owner-channels-top-vibes-running-positively-fourth-street-in-downtown-santa-rosa/ You don’t have to believe in metaphysics to vibrate with the special energy emanating from Positively Fourth Street. Maybe it’s the crystals and gemstones for sale in the downtown Santa Rosa shop – sacred rocks that many say have magical, healing and restorative powers. Perhaps it’s the array of handmade scarves and other knick-knacks from […]]]>

You don’t have to believe in metaphysics to vibrate with the special energy emanating from Positively Fourth Street.

Maybe it’s the crystals and gemstones for sale in the downtown Santa Rosa shop – sacred rocks that many say have magical, healing and restorative powers. Perhaps it’s the array of handmade scarves and other knick-knacks from artists and artisans from across the Bay Area. It could be the wall of silly dress socks, like the ones with taco cats or the image of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Owner Randy Harris is also charismatic. He and his gray ponytail have been running the place for 28 years.

Whatever the source of energy, whatever the reason for the attraction, it’s nearly impossible to walk into the eclectic, new-age shop next to Mac’s Deli and Cafe and not find something arousing. your interest, increases your curiosity and attracts you.

“I sell to people over 70, under 7, and everyone in between,” Harris said. “Something for everyone, it’s all unlike anything you’ve seen before.”

From San Francisco to Santa Rosa

Positively Fourth Street is one of the oldest businesses downtown. It opened in 1994. In the preceding months, Harris ran two other stores in the Bay Area – one in Berkeley and another in San Francisco. When the lease for the San Francisco store expired, he decided to launch a new operation in Santa Rosa.

The rest, as they say, is history.

Harris chose Santa Rosa because he knew Sonoma County customers would be “receptive” to the items he liked to sell. Beyond that, he really didn’t know the market. He had a few distant relatives who owned properties in Sebastopol and Guerneville, but that was it.

“At the time, I didn’t know much about Santa Rosa except that the people seemed nice and it felt like a place that would encompass my store,” he said. “It turned out to be a great decision.”

Harris and his wife Melissa moved north the following year and have made Santa Rosa their home ever since.

People always ask Harris for the name of the store, and he said he chose the name by “trying to think of something positive that also had the address in it.” He acknowledged that he was inspired by Bob Dylan’s song of the same name, but noted that the song wasn’t exactly positive – it was bittersweet and derisive.

“My other stores were called Marketplace on Haight Street and Dragonstar Design, so my names have been everywhere,” he joked.

At first, Harris did his best to stock the Santa Rosa store with “interesting items” from artisans he knew from all over the area, especially Berkeley and North Bay. Little by little, he built up a network of artists on consignment. Depending on the time of year, more than half of the store’s inventory may be made by local artisans and artists from the area.

Each month, these artists drop off new material and collect payment for the objects they dropped off the previous month.

“We’re really trying to make it a locals store,” he said. “There are a lot of creative people here.”

Unique trinkets for everyone

Considering the volume of goods Harris carries, it’s quite an achievement to offer so much local craftsmanship.

The 69-year-old Central Valley native estimates he has over 1,000 items in the store at any one time, including handcrafted rings, incense, silk scarves, printed cards by hand and those silly socks. There is an extensive collection of crystals and rocks, as well as incense, weed bags, t-shirts and even Himalayan salt lamps. Sometimes it feels like the store is almost overflowing with different items.

Crystals account for approximately 30% of sales. Smoky Quartz, Aquamarine, Amethyst – you name the crystal, they probably sell it at Positively Fourth Street.

He noted that two of the most popular items are crystal pendants wrapped in wire by Santa Rosa artist Leo Gonzalez and bracelets made of beads that resemble evil eyes, believed to ward off evil spirits.

Another popular item: the enamel-glazed copper switch plate covers, by Berkeley artist Ray Storch.

Storch and Harris go back a long way – the two have known each other for 40 years and became friends when they were both part of a group of artisans selling wares on Telegraph Avenue in the 1980s.

Storch said he thinks no salesperson has worn his work longer than Harris, and added he’s “proud” to sell his pieces at Positively Fourth Street because the shop has an appeal to the old fashioned way that makes customers happy with the things they buy.

“(Harris) has a great eye for new work,” Storch said. “Randy himself is one of the things that makes the store special because he talks to people, makes suggestions and helps them make decisions.”

Customers have also applauded the feeling they get when shopping at Positively Fourth Street.

Santa Rosa resident and owner of Prenatal Vinyasa Yoga, Jennifer More, said she frequents the shop when looking for crystals to give to friends in need.

“The staff is so kind, they helped me find the best stones to cure different cancers and they gave great recommendations,” she said. “I love that it’s kind of a new-age store with down-to-earth staff. They go out of their way to help me find the perfect gift every time I go.

Continue to serve customers

Harris balked upon hearing those comments, saying he and his team of four work hard to make every customer feel welcome.

He added that since the store has been open for 28 years and suffered a three-month closure during the COVID-19 pandemic, he is confident that Positively Fourth Street will continue to thrive and live well beyond its 30th anniversary. in the future.

“We’ve been here a while, we survived COVID, we’re not going anywhere anytime soon,” he joked.

Harris doesn’t have any major or earth-shattering plans for the future of the store — he’s just doing more of what he’s always done. Positively Fourth Street recently replaced an old-fashioned cash register with the Square computerized payment system, and Harris joked that was more than enough change for a period of time.

In the meantime, Harris promises to continue working with local artists and said he will continue to source items from the Las Vegas International Gift Show each year. He’s also committed to the same friendly customer service that has made him so popular with Santa Rosa shoppers over the years.

At some point, he said, he might consider retiring, in which case he would spend more time playing guitar and hand the store over to someone else.

“This place has established itself over the years – good people who appreciate good craftsmanship and a variety of choices,” he said. “I intend to serve these customers for as long as possible.”

]]>
Sweet victory for guitar winners https://deimel.biz/sweet-victory-for-guitar-winners/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 01:35:08 +0000 https://deimel.biz/sweet-victory-for-guitar-winners/ Coming together through music and art: Dusty Harris, 4, Fleet Leahy, 2, Boe Leahy, 6, and Tanner Harris, 7, participated in the Echuca-Moama Winter Blues Festival decorative guitar competition. Photo by Steve Huntley Nine talented people have proven they have an artistic flair for creating outstanding designs, after being named the winners of the decorative […]]]>

Coming together through music and art: Dusty Harris, 4, Fleet Leahy, 2, Boe Leahy, 6, and Tanner Harris, 7, participated in the Echuca-Moama Winter Blues Festival decorative guitar competition. Photo by Steve Huntley

Nine talented people have proven they have an artistic flair for creating outstanding designs, after being named the winners of the decorative guitar competition at the Echuca-Moama Winter Blues Festival.

More than 60 guitars were painted, decorated and displayed in store windows for passers-by to marvel at.

All winners received a voucher from the festival committee, which they can present to local businesses, who must honor the voucher and then send it back to the committee for reimbursement.

As for the winners, Finlay Bachelor, Anil Whiting and Isabella Louttit took the top spots for the 5-12 age group.

In the 13-17 age bracket, Jade Rourke, Lincoln Bohn and Bindhi Stewart were the talented winners.

Stacey Siede, Maryann Jenkins and Kristine Briggs triumphed in the adult category (over 18).

Dave Callanan, festival committee member and coordinator of the decorative guitar contest, said the contest would not have been so successful without the help of volunteers.

“A big thank you to Patricia Rowe who organized guitar painting sessions during the school holidays, to the Echuca library who organized these sessions and to all the volunteers who helped transport the guitars to the stores”, he said. -he declares.

Rochester Miter 10, who donated the wood for the guitars, and the members of Echuca-Moama Men’s Shed who fabricated and cut all the guitar blanks were also helpful.

Decorative guitars can now be picked up from retail stores and restaurants where they were displayed.

]]>
Jerry Garcia Archive celebrates the life and legacy of the Grateful Dead icon https://deimel.biz/jerry-garcia-archive-celebrates-the-life-and-legacy-of-the-grateful-dead-icon/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 09:01:12 +0000 https://deimel.biz/jerry-garcia-archive-celebrates-the-life-and-legacy-of-the-grateful-dead-icon/ Just in time for what would have been his 80e birthday, Jerry Garcia is set to be celebrated with the launch of a new online archive honoring the iconic Grateful Dead singer and guitarist. The Jerry Garcia Archive, a collaborative venture between the Jerry Garcia Foundation and online storage platform Starchive, will serve as an […]]]>
]]>
Emotional Creature: On their new Beach Bunny album, they prove they’re more than Prom Queen’s viral TikTok hit https://deimel.biz/emotional-creature-on-their-new-beach-bunny-album-they-prove-theyre-more-than-prom-queens-viral-tiktok-hit/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 17:00:29 +0000 https://deimel.biz/emotional-creature-on-their-new-beach-bunny-album-they-prove-theyre-more-than-prom-queens-viral-tiktok-hit/ There’s an online delivery on “Weeds,” the best song from Beach Bunny’s second album emotional creature which embodies precisely what has made them connect with countless pop stans, music critics and a 59-year-old TV star. “You can’t hold me / I’m a rocket that bursts”, sings Lili Trifilio. It’s a choice of words you can […]]]>

There’s an online delivery on “Weeds,” the best song from Beach Bunny’s second album emotional creature which embodies precisely what has made them connect with countless pop stans, music critics and a 59-year-old TV star. “You can’t hold me / I’m a rocket that bursts”, sings Lili Trifilio. It’s a choice of words you can see coming – after all, few rhymes with “locket” and “pocket” from the previous bars – but that doesn’t make it any less satisfying or cathartic when the lyrics come out with a hard-confidence. won.

“‘Weeds’ was…almost like I was trying to wake up from feeling sorry for myself, still victimizing myself, being in these toxic patterns,” the 25-year-old musician says. “I wrote it like I was my own best friend having some kind of intervention.”

For the past half-decade, Beach Bunny has filled this role of confidant and motivator thanks to Lili’s willingness to set her own struggles to music. In 2018, she brought guitarist Matt Henkels, drummer Jon Alvarado and bassist Anthony Vaccaro into the fold after initially starting Beach Bunny as a solo project. The band won fans in their hometown of Chicago, but gained international notoriety with the viral hit of “Prom Queen,” a disarmingly candid song about the effects of unhealthy beauty standards.

The song established Beach Bunny’s MO. While peanut butter pop songs have been around forever, the band don’t hide diartic lyrics about dysfunctional relationships, self-esteem and anxiety in bright melodies. The booming guitar chords and soaring choruses are not there to cut the power, but to increase it. Most songs on emotional creature would be excellent stripped to the bone and rendered acoustic, but they wouldn’t be unmistakable, as are the shimmering hooks of warmth on “Gone” and “Scream.”

Lili and I meet one overcast morning near her Bucktown apartment on the Sunday before the release of Beach Bunny’s latest album. In person, she is cheerful and quick to laugh, but not overly gregarious. She is contemplative, without appearing too calculated. After our conversation is over, she will spend at least 45 minutes chatting with all the local artists and designers selling their work at the cafe.

She’s candid about the pressure of heightened expectations that come with the band’s skyrocketing visibility, and says she’s actually “grateful.” emotional creature has been postponed a few times. This not only gave the band and their label, indie darling Mom + Pop, time to plan an extensive rollout and redo a few music videos, but also allowed Lili to prepare to release such a candid and revealing project. wider in the group. public again.

“I had to realize that I was really obsessed with what people thought about things. With social media, we all have so much access to that, so I had to cut myself off and be like, ‘You have write these songs for yourself, no matter what people think. You’re gonna turn it off anyway. Relax,” she said. “I don’t even think anyone is pressuring me, I pressured me.”

The thematic weight of the record is balanced by a retro-futuristic aesthetic that encompasses the album cover, the tour posters, as well as the videos for “Weeds” and “Entropy”, which combine to tell the story of the album. a daring spaceship. rescue. Recalling the first star wars trilogy, the videos are happily homemade, but Lili says the undercurrent of otherworldly sci-fi has to do with the anxiety and uncertainty that one would have to be an alien not to have felt in recent years.

“It was my form of escape and a lot of songs were written in that form – wanting to escape what was happening on planet Earth,” she explains.

Lili says she is a fan of the “era” artists who create a distinct look and feel around each set of works. It’s the kind of thing most often associated with big labels with huge budgets to play with, but in some ways Beach Bunny is closer to that level of notoriety than you might think. The band’s top three songs on Spotify have made what can only be described as Post Malone numbers. The TikTok ubiquity of “Prom Queen” and “Cloud 9” certainly helped, and now their continued success coincides with the much-hyped emo/pop punk revival. But while much of this music sounds cynical and retro-engineered, Beach Bunny is seriously endearing. The decision to write warm-toned indie rock with a confessional edge isn’t made to court playlist placements or score comparisons with influential alternative acts.

​Zachary Hertzman Photography

“I was very embarrassed once when an interviewer asked me if I listened to Liz Phair and I didn’t,” she recalls. “I really wasn’t very familiar, and then in the interview they kind of roasted me that I didn’t know who Liz Phair was because, in her opinion, that had be the only influence.

In support of emotional creature, the band have a relentless touring schedule, including what is sure to be a crowning performance at Lollapalooza and dates all over Europe. There’s a pressure that comes with these high-profile sets, but Lili says getting back in front of the audience was key to changing her perspective on the band.

“When you play the numbers game, which a lot of us musicians were doing during the pandemic, it’s hard to even understand that number of people and whether the comments are positive or negative,” she says. “I just don’t think it’s natural for human beings to have so many opinions.”

It’s an understandable reaction, especially with music as deeply personal as what she’s written here. The album encompasses a wide range of feelings, from frustration over romantic relapses to the dizzying vulnerability of falling in love with someone new, which is captured on the final three tracks. The LP even nods to Lili’s pandemic hobby of making beats on her computer with the celestial instrumental interlude “Gravity.”

“It was a tribute to that period of life that I was singing about and – I feel like it didn’t quite work out – but I was trying to transition from the first part of the album which is really in it emotionally, it’s the medium where I have some accomplishments, and then it ends well, ”she explains.

“Weeds”, the last single before emotional creature release, has been in the works since 2019, when Beach Bunny was just beginning to become what it is now. For Lili, it’s her favorite track on the album, largely because her years-long journey to completion reflects her own journey to becoming the person she is today.

“[When I wrote the song] I was like, “I hope I stop doing all this toxic stuff” and the moment it was recorded, I [felt] a feeling of letting go, but I wasn’t there until the end,” says Lili. “Now, with another year passing, I’m like, ‘Yeah, I can take a deep breath and let it go. “”

Follow iD on Instagram and TikTok for more music.

]]>
Hit Squad 17 takes aim at the Sound Bites Grill https://deimel.biz/hit-squad-17-takes-aim-at-the-sound-bites-grill/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 18:00:27 +0000 https://deimel.biz/hit-squad-17-takes-aim-at-the-sound-bites-grill/ From left to right: Dru on bass, Scott Henderson on drums; and Joe Seratto on guitar. In the center, on vocals is lead singer Lucy Hill. (Photo courtesy of Sound Bites Grill) On Friday, July 29, from 6-9 p.m., Sound Bites Grill proudly presents Hit Squad 17, rocking the hits we’ve come to love over […]]]>

From left to right: Dru on bass, Scott Henderson on drums; and Joe Seratto on guitar. In the center, on vocals is lead singer Lucy Hill. (Photo courtesy of Sound Bites Grill)

On Friday, July 29, from 6-9 p.m., Sound Bites Grill proudly presents Hit Squad 17, rocking the hits we’ve come to love over the years.

This band is serious about making music that gets people out of their chairs, up and dancing.

Solid as a rock, this group hits the high notes and brings new energy to the songs that classic rock fans appreciate so much.

Led by lead singer Lucy Hill, the group dances through dance, funk, rock, pop and R&B tunes, setting the beat one needs to get down.

Joined by Joe Serrato on guitar, Dru on bass and Scott Henderson on drums, the band melts into a high-energy musical entertainment machine.

Classic rock defines this cover band, playing all the great tunes loved by the baby boomer generation.

If you’re looking for a night of high-energy rock and dance like nobody’s watching, be sure to catch this band live. They’re not called Hit Squad for nothing.

On Saturday, July 30, from 6-9 p.m., Sound Bites presents the Eric Miller Trio, featuring Eric Miller on guitar and vocals, Eddie Barattini on drums, and Troy Perkins on bass.

These three are considered some of the most successful musicians in the Sedona music scene.

Miller is known for his unique playing and singing style and can capture any musical theme from hard rock to classical.

He is a local favorite and is a regular performer on the Sound Bites Grill Celebrity Showroom stage.

Barattini holds the pulse and is the heart of the beat that gets people dancing.

Perkins sets the pace and maintains the beat throughout the show.

Beautiful lighting, a professional sound system and a New York supper-club atmosphere create the perfect place to enjoy a great meal and live music, up close and personal.

Other Sedona musical luminaries to be featured during the week include: Patrick Ki on Wineaux on Wednesday, July 27 from 5-8 p.m.; Eric Miller & Adriel Zang on Thursday July 28 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; and jazz impresario Dave Len Scott on Sunday, July 31 from 5 to 8 p.m.

Sound Bites Grill is located in Pinon Point Shops, next to the Hyatt in Sedona. For more information, please visit SoundBitesGrill.com or call 928 282 2714. Tickets can be purchased through the website.

Information provided by Sound Bites Grill.

]]>
Live Report: Trousdale brings country-pop-infused harmonies to Dolan’s https://deimel.biz/live-report-trousdale-brings-country-pop-infused-harmonies-to-dolans/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 18:02:01 +0000 https://deimel.biz/live-report-trousdale-brings-country-pop-infused-harmonies-to-dolans/ Hailing from California, country-folk band Trousdale took to the stage at Kasbah Social Club at Dolan’s to perform their first-ever show in Limerick on Thursday, July 21. On Thursday, July 21, American country-pop band Trousdale took to the Kasbah stage at Dolan’s for a night of heart-pounding country-pop music. Composed of Quinn D’Andrea, Georgia Greene […]]]>

Hailing from California, country-folk band Trousdale took to the stage at Kasbah Social Club at Dolan’s to perform their first-ever show in Limerick on Thursday, July 21.

On Thursday, July 21, American country-pop band Trousdale took to the Kasbah stage at Dolan’s for a night of heart-pounding country-pop music.

Composed of Quinn D’Andrea, Georgia Greene and Lauren Jones, Trousdale hails from the prestigious popular music program at the University of Southern California. The group formed in 2014 with their first release about six years later in 2020.

On their first-ever tour across Europe, the acoustic trio stopped at Dolan’s in Limerick for an intimate mid-week gig with backing from Dublin-based family band CARRON.

CARRON is composed of sisters Méabh and Mella Carron accompanied in the evening by Darragh, Méabh’s new husband, on guitar. Going on stage around twenty minutes to nine, the trio were extremely grateful to Trousdale for accompanying them on their two dates in Ireland. Brandishing a great connection between the trio – the sisters’ tight harmonies and tone of voice scream Disney’s Celtic princess. Think HAIM, Dianna Agron and Anna Camp all combined with an Irish twang.

Great covers of “Shake It Out” by Florence + the Machine, and a mix of “Don’t” by Ed Sheeran, Blackstreet, Dr Dre and “No Diggity” by Queen Pen, as well as “Thrift Shop” by Macklemore , ensured that the audience was not short of familiar songs. However, when it comes to original material, CARRON has struck all the right chords. With a slew of tracks already released on streaming platforms, the sisters let the public know that they were working on an album. Their original tracks were where their harmonies and vocal turns shone, with a song “Numb” including a stunning canon near the end. The stunning vocals fused with effortless guitar created a wonderful listening experience. It was obvious that these tracks came from the heart of the sisters’ family bond, adding an element of sweetness to each perfectly written lyric. The small but attentive crowd responded with joy to CARRON’s set, praising the trio as they exited the stage.

Announced by John Hennessy of Seoda Shows, Trousdale arrived on stage wearing brightly colored denim jumpsuits. As soon as they arrived on stage, the all-female band had the audience in the palm of their hands. They opened the show by discussing their show the night before at Whelan’s, where their keyboards popped out – “dumb Americans” they called themselves. They joked about how the person who helped them fix worked for the Cranberries adding, “I guess they’re a big deal here??”

After their banter, the trio began their first song “Bad Blood” from their upcoming album. My jaw hit the ground. With just an acoustic guitar, keyboard, foot tambourine and shakers, the band sounded better than most full bands I’ve seen. The three folk-country vocal layers rival any Taylor Swift or The Chicks track I’ve heard, giving me goosebumps from the first note to their last song. I couldn’t blame Trousdale even if I wanted to. Even my diehard punk boyfriend was speechless at their performance.

The Los Angeles-based singers performed a solid mix of unreleased and older material, including personal highlights from “This Is It,” heavy country track “Point Your Finger,” “If I’m Honest,” and ” Wouldn’t Come Back”. Listening to the powerful lyrics of each song, it’s no surprise the band spent days in Nashville with expert songwriters Natalie Hemby and Jon Bellion. As an avowed country-pop fanatic, I knew this band wouldn’t be a hard sell, but there was something about forgetting ‘Night Changes’ is a One Direction song when it’s so good recovery that blew me away.

While all three singers were phenomenal, Georgia Greene’s vocals were the most outstanding vocals I’ve ever heard live. My eyes brimming with tears for most of the night, Georgia’s voice filled the room in an astonishing way – for such a small woman, the power of her voice is indescribable.

Before the band finished their set, the audience begged for “one more bit”, with one audience member informing the band “this is how we do it in Ireland”. After checking with the promoter, the band accepted two more tracks – a request for audience and a cover. ‘Better Off’, a beautifully soulful anthem track, was specially requested by the audience, leaving the crowd with chills. Clearly very close to guitarist Lauren, this song was deeply personal. Ending with an exquisite cover of the Eagles’ “Heartache Tonight”, these three Americans got a Limerick crowd going.

In a short interview after the show, Trousdale spoke about their love for Ireland. “We’re having the best time. We said it on stage but everyone here is so nice, like MUCH nicer than in the States, and it was shocking,” the band confessed. ‘We booked a few places we knew we absolutely wanted to come to and Ireland was one of them. Then our European booking agent organized the shows for us and we were really blown away by the response we received.’ got and by kindness.”

Naming their musical influences The Chicks, Taylor Swift, Fleetwood Mac, Joni Mitchell, The Eagles, Johnny Marr, Sara Bareilles, The Beatles, etc., guitarist Lauren explained: “We all grew up with very different musical influences, so I think they all sort of play into our writing.”

Finally, the trio gave me a glimpse of what’s in store for them as a group. The group revealed that they are currently hard at work writing their debut album, with the first single due to arrive this fall. “The whole thing will probably be due early next year and we’re producing it ourselves.”

After hearing a little preview of this upcoming album, I wouldn’t be surprised if Trousdale is an internationally household name by this time next year.

Check out Trousdale’s latest single “Do Re Mi” below.

]]>
Where are the homeless during Oregon22? City officials and homeless people weigh in | New https://deimel.biz/where-are-the-homeless-during-oregon22-city-officials-and-homeless-people-weigh-in-new/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 01:26:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/where-are-the-homeless-during-oregon22-city-officials-and-homeless-people-weigh-in-new/ EUGENE, Ore.– This is a mystery to many people living in Eugene; once Oregon22 launched, the homeless suddenly disappeared. Niall Vallega, a Buy2 store employee, said about a week ago he noticed fewer people hanging around the store on the 100 block of W Broadway Ave in downtown Eugene. “Now that the matches are here, […]]]>

EUGENE, Ore.– This is a mystery to many people living in Eugene; once Oregon22 launched, the homeless suddenly disappeared.

Niall Vallega, a Buy2 store employee, said about a week ago he noticed fewer people hanging around the store on the 100 block of W Broadway Ave in downtown Eugene.

“Now that the matches are here, they’ve definitely kicked out all the homeless people,” Vallega said. “They usually hang around every corner; music, playing guitar, drinking, smoking, but they haven’t been here at all. I haven’t seen them since the games started.”

Vallega said it was quiet and much cleaner. However, he said he missed all the activity.

“I’m not going to lie, I liked it. I’m from a big city, it’s a hippie town, I like that they play guitar on the corner and stuff like that” , Vallega said.






Richard is a homeless veteran who has lived on the streets of Eugene for over a year. He told KEZI that ever since people started coming for the World Athletics Championships, city officials have been trying to clean up the streets, including those who live there.

“It’s embarrassing for them, I’m sure,” Richard said. “Scaring people away, homeless people so they can’t be seen, you know, there’s a lot going on, just trying to hold them back.”

Hung Tran has been living on the streets since April and told KEZI he experienced the same thing.

“The city, they’re pretty much pushing a lot of us into the dugouts, away from the games,” Tran said.

Tran said he felt hurt and embarrassed.

“I feel like we’re not a person, just a number,” Tran said.

City officials said there were no plans in place to move people specifically during the World Championships in Athletics.

In a statement, officials said:

“To be absolutely clear: the transition and closure of the two temporary camps, and the city’s unauthorized camping response since the lifting of the temporary stay-in-place order is entirely unrelated to WCH Oregon22.

The city recognizes that this is a very difficult issue and is working with local partners to find solutions that balance neighborhood livability, safety, health, and compassionate and humane responses to homelessness. This includes developing and supporting alternative shelters, permanent supportive housing, and other projects aimed at improving community stability and prosperity. »

]]>