Music gross – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 16:18:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deimel.biz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music gross – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ 32 32 Wave Pool’s ‘Pool Party’ Brings an Inflatable Water Slide, Artist Carnival and Live Music to Camp Washington | cultural | Cincinnati https://deimel.biz/wave-pools-pool-party-brings-an-inflatable-water-slide-artist-carnival-and-live-music-to-camp-washington-cultural-cincinnati/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 16:18:30 +0000 https://deimel.biz/wave-pools-pool-party-brings-an-inflatable-water-slide-artist-carnival-and-live-music-to-camp-washington-cultural-cincinnati/ Click to enlarge Photo: Tina Gutierrez/Supplied by Wave Pool Wave Pool’s Pool Party will have an inflatable slide. Camp Washington’s community and arts organization, Wave Pool, is hosting a neighborhood “Pool Party,” and the event isn’t just a fun pun — it’s literally a “summer swim party filled with fun.” art,” according to a statement. […]]]>
Click to enlarge

Photo: Tina Gutierrez/Supplied by Wave Pool

Wave Pool’s Pool Party will have an inflatable slide.

Camp Washington’s community and arts organization, Wave Pool, is hosting a neighborhood “Pool Party,” and the event isn’t just a fun pun — it’s literally a “summer swim party filled with fun.” art,” according to a statement.

On August 20, the area around Rachel Street and Colerain Avenue in Camp Washington will transform into a block party, with food, drinks, games, live music, an art fair, “portraits psychedelics” and an inflatable slide.

From noon to 5 p.m., revelers can enjoy live music from Mynah Tones, Cold Stereo, Static Falls, and Willie and the Cigs, plus parades from the Heavy Metal Marching Band.

There will also be creative, art-inspired carnival games like PLINKO, putt-putt, a bean toss and a duck pond, with Wave Pool artist-in-residence Nikita Gross on hand to draw portraits .

The Wave Pool parking lot will also transform into the “9×18 Parking Lot Art Experiment” art fair, full of “performances, artistic actions, experimental engagements and ephemeral works,” according to a statement. There will also be glassblowing demonstrations at the nearby Glory Hole Glassworks.

Food and beverages will be available, including “poolside” themed items and tamales.

Wave Pool’s Pool Party is the organization’s annual fundraiser, which oversees programs for artists and the community.

According to the release, in addition to paying more than 180 artists for their “time and talent” in 2021, Wave Pool has also “helped our community access food through our Soup and Stories and Cincinnati’s Table events, helped the mental health and recovery through our Owning Your Own Voice and beautifying our neighborhood with over 40 hand-painted and handcrafted art flower boxes in addition to dozens of other programs and initiatives.”

The wave pool is located at 2940 Colerain Ave., Camp Washington. For more information, visit wavepoolgallery.org.

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‘Bullet Train’ tops N.America box office https://deimel.biz/bullet-train-tops-n-america-box-office/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 17:50:12 +0000 https://deimel.biz/bullet-train-tops-n-america-box-office/ Published on: 08/07/2022 – 19:50Amended: 08/07/2022 – 19:48 Los Angeles (AFP) – Sony’s “Bullet Train,” the last big studio release of the summer, pulled in strong ticket sales of $30.1 million over the weekend to top the North American box office, it was estimated on Sunday. Exhibitor Relations industry watcher. It was “a solid opening […]]]>

Published on: Amended:

Los Angeles (AFP) – Sony’s “Bullet Train,” the last big studio release of the summer, pulled in strong ticket sales of $30.1 million over the weekend to top the North American box office, it was estimated on Sunday. Exhibitor Relations industry watcher.

It was “a solid opening for an action thriller,” said analyst David A. Gross, adding that star Brad Pitt’s presence “is going to ensure international success.”

Pitt, who plays a professional assassin on a Japanese train apparently loaded with them, leads a cast that includes Joey King, Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Latin music star Bad Bunny, as well as Sandra Bullock and Channing Tatum in bit parts .

Helming “Bullet Train” is former Pitt stuntman David Leitch, who made a name for himself directing action movies.

Last weekend’s box office leader Warner Bros. animated “DC League of Super-Pets,” slipped a notch to second place, taking in $11.2 million for the Friday-Sunday period.

Third place went to Universal’s horror film “Nope,” at $8.5 million. The sci-fi flick, bolstered by the involvement of acclaimed writer/director Jordan Peele, only grossed just under $100 million domestically. Daniel Kaluuya plays.

In fourth place was Disney’s action comedy “Thor: Love and Thunder,” at $7.6 million. Chris Hemsworth stars as the ultra-muscled space Viking, who yearns for his ex-girlfriend (Natalie Portman).

And in fifth place, Universal’s family animation “Minions: The Rise of Gru”. This latest installment in the “Despicable Me” franchise grossed $7.1 million.

Overall, the summer season has been good for Hollywood, Gross said. “Audiences did everything they were asked…and business was very good for all types of films.”

The top 10 of the weekend was completed by:

“Top Gun: Maverick” ($7 million)

“Where the Crawdads Sing” ($5.7 million)

“Easter Sunday” ($5.3 million)

“Elvis” ($4 million)

“The Black Phone” ($1.5 million)

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The first Waves of Grain music festival will take place at Gross Farms | Archives https://deimel.biz/the-first-waves-of-grain-music-festival-will-take-place-at-gross-farms-archives/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/the-first-waves-of-grain-music-festival-will-take-place-at-gross-farms-archives/ The venue in Gross Farms recently announced the 2022 Waves of Grain Music Festival scheduled for August 26-27. This year’s inaugural event will feature three genres of music. Saturday’s flagship event will feature an afternoon of legendary beach music from the stalwarts of the beach music world. The event will kick off with The Band […]]]>

The venue in Gross Farms recently announced the 2022 Waves of Grain Music Festival scheduled for August 26-27.

This year’s inaugural event will feature three genres of music.

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It’s time for big-name artists to join the new music labor movement https://deimel.biz/its-time-for-big-name-artists-to-join-the-new-music-labor-movement/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 18:16:53 +0000 https://deimel.biz/its-time-for-big-name-artists-to-join-the-new-music-labor-movement/ It’s a story without bold names, or at least not the kind you usually read in Vanity Room. And yet, it’s the story of more than 28,000 musicians and music industry workers, and some of the biggest companies in the world. At the start of the pandemic, when live music was shut down, a group […]]]>

It’s a story without bold names, or at least not the kind you usually read in Vanity Room.

And yet, it’s the story of more than 28,000 musicians and music industry workers, and some of the biggest companies in the world.

At the start of the pandemic, when live music was shut down, a group of indie musicians and music workers began meeting weekly on Zoom to share ideas on what we could do to improve the difficult situation at hand. which we were faced with. From these meetings emerged a new advocacy organization, the Union of Musicians and Allied Workers (UMAW). And among the actions taken by UMAW was a reexamination of the economics of music streaming. From scratch, you might say, what it looks like for real working musicians.

Streaming dominates the recorded music industry – it’s now responsible for 83% of all US recorded music revenue, according to record label association RIAA. The remaining 17% includes every other use of recorded music you can think of: not just physical sales and digital downloads, but also soundtracks for movies and TV, and licensing for commercials and trademarks. There just isn’t much left of a recorded music business outside of streaming.

The problem is that streaming barely pays recording artists. There are currently no direct payments from streaming platforms to the musicians themselves, as is the case, for example, with satellite radio. The average per-stream royalty paid by platforms to rightsholders (i.e. record labels) is $0.007 gross, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research, and record labels typically keep between 50% and 85% of these receipts. As a result, it takes tens of millions if not hundreds or thousands of millions of streams for artists to earn anything like a living wage from their streaming work. Many artists effectively no longer earn any income from their recordings.

Meanwhile, the streaming platforms themselves are booming: their revenues increased by 24.3% in 2021, reaching a total of $16.9 billion. Paid streaming is only dominated by a few companies. According to market researcher MIDIA, Spotify is by far the major player with 31% of the market, more than double its nearest competitors, Apple (15%) and Amazon (13%). Add in Chinese media giant Tencent (13%) and Alphabet/Google’s YouTube subscription service (8%), and you have 80% of all global streaming subscription revenue managed by just five companies, including many of the richest in the world.

Note that only one of these companies would even call itself a music business – and that’s probably only temporary. Here’s Spotify co-founder and CEO Daniel Ek speaking to his investors earlier this year, as Quoted by Variety:

“The best companies — think of names you all know very well — are very different today than they were when they started,” Ek said. “They made their initial mark in one specific category: books. [Amazon]look for [Google]desktop computers [Apple]. And then they redefined the way we think about these categories by expanding their potential through innovation…. And it’s exactly the same journey that we’re doing.

Ek’s points of comparison are not random. They are its closest competitors in US and European music streaming. Spotify’s recent investments in podcasting, sports and games make it clear how little music is ultimately about the company – its corporate statements now refer to ‘audio’ rather than ‘music’ .

In other words, recording musicians have become entirely dependent on companies that seem to have little or no interest in the future of recorded music. These companies are growing while musicians are suffering.

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10 Must-See Events in the Hudson Valley, August 2-8 https://deimel.biz/10-must-see-events-in-the-hudson-valley-august-2-8/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 22:00:58 +0000 https://deimel.biz/10-must-see-events-in-the-hudson-valley-august-2-8/ 1 Get sand in your eyes – For fans of dark fantasy, Neil Gaiman is a household name and a prolific source of inspiration. Local fans feel especially close, as Gaiman has counted the Hudson Valley as one of his homes in the past. This Friday, August 5, World’s End Comics in Kingston will host […]]]>

1

Get sand in your eyes – For fans of dark fantasy, Neil Gaiman is a household name and a prolific source of inspiration. Local fans feel especially close, as Gaiman has counted the Hudson Valley as one of his homes in the past. This Friday, August 5, World’s End Comics in Kingston will host a special party from 6 p.m. to midnight to bring Gaiman’s latest story to life on screen, Sand seller. The comic book it’s based on was released in 1989, and after decades of false starts and developmental issues, the long-awaited TV adaptation has arrived. Attendees will watch the first six episodes in a back-to-back binge, hopefully in costume (prizes will be awarded). Admission is free but pre-registration is required. See worldsendkingston.com register.

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Witness the opposite of war – Peace seems rare these days, so don’t miss the 12th Annual Bon Odori Dance Festival for Peace. This annual tradition will take place on Saturday, August 6 at TR Gallo Park in Kingston from noon to 8 p.m. It commemorates the 77th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the 11th anniversary of the collapse of Fukushima and the 36th anniversary of the collapse of Chernobyl. There will be speeches by survivors of the Hiroshima bombing, as well as the Buddhist monk, Reverend DT Kenjilsu Nakagaki Jodo Shinshu. Performers include a Japanese folk dance company, percussion by Taiko, actors Momo Suzuki and Sakura Kojima, the Spirit of Thunderheart and the Vanaver Caravan.

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Enjoy advanced voices —The Phenicia Festival of the Voice is a celebration of music made from the humblest of instruments: the human anatomy. We developed the ability to create music for a myriad of reasons, and it all started with our voices. We’ve come a long way from mimicking nature to seeing top talent produce sounds of incredible beauty, with just two vocal chords and a diaphragm. And while today this miraculous instrument is often lost in auto-tune filters and vocal processing effects, this festival truly showcases the human voice in its most evolved form. Enjoy opera (including an exploration of opera in film), orchestral performances with huge choirs of 100, and more voice worship. The three-day festival runs from Friday, August 5 through Sunday, August 7, and tickets range from $100 to $250. More than phoeniciavoicefest.org.

4

Italian fun — For the uninitiated, pétanque can be a bit confusing. From the outside, it may look like an odd combination of curling, shuffleboard, bowling, horseshoes and billiards. In fact, the game is incredibly easy to pick up and play for all ages. The basics: throw a ball, then throw bigger balls as close to the first thrown ball as possible. Simple enough, but the rivalries he creates are legendary, with the ability to knock down his opponents’ balls. This Sunday, August 7, the Italian American Foundation of Ulster County will celebrate the rich history of this wonderful pastime with a family bocce day at Robert Post Park in Kingston. It’s free for everyone and starts at 2 p.m.

5

Jazz up on the beach — It’s a great week for outdoor concert lovers in Saugerties. The village beach is always a cool place to relax in the sun. But this Thursday, August 4 at 6 p.m., things get even cooler, with a free concert featuring Madeline Moneypenny and her band, The Mellowphones. Lush vocals, jazzy styles and inventive beats are showcased by the ShoutOut Saugerties program, which seeks to encourage and promote creative endeavors across the city. On Friday, August 5, you can enjoy another Saugerties sunset concert at Tina Chorvas Park, featuring Maria Sebastian, Eric Sqindo and Amy Laber.

6

Enjoy prolific musicality – When you write over 1,600 songs, you know a thing or two about music. Joel Forrester has accomplished much in his prolific career as a pianist and composer. You probably know him as the author of NPR’s theme. Fresh air with Terry Gross, but it is only a piece of his song encyclopedia. This Saturday, August 6, he brings a virtuoso quartet of new and innovative jazz artists to Barnstock in Saugerties at 7:30 p.m. To say that Forrester follows his passion is an understatement. He is the living embodiment of music and Barnstock is a great outdoor stage to showcase his wonderful works of art. Donations at the door are suggested, as are lawn chairs.

seven

Make some noise on the dance floor — How strange is the term “dance music”? Technically you can dance to any music (although we don’t know if you want to to.) Proving this point (rather strong, I might add) are Whoah! and Grampfather, two bands from the area who share the common goal of throwing a dance party that feels much more like a punk/indie bustle than a foursome DJ set on Ibizan soil on Friday August 5th at Keegan Ales , 7 p.m. We all know dancing is good for your health, so maybe that’s why this is an O+ “Summer Sessions” production. As the 12th Annual Health-Meets-Arts-Meets-Music Festival gears up for October, this is your chance to get some exercise with two up-and-coming acts from the Hudson Valley.

8

Solid as a rock – What better way to celebrate the 60th anniversary of Jamaica’s independence and the 41st anniversary of Upstate Reggae with The Big Takeover, our region’s first reggae-roots-rock band? This is a band that is 110% at home in a town like Woodstock, worshiping every genre with a hyphen. And as anyone who’s seen The Big Takeover will attest, they’re doing more than doing these island sounds justice – they’ve defined their own sound, with ever-larger audiences picking up the frequency. The Colony Beer Garden in Woodstock will be packed with revelers looking to get moving and dancing this Saturday, August 6. Tickets cost between $22 and $27.

9

Discover well-being and wonder — Vanaver Caravan Youth Company is stopping at Stone Mountain Farm in Red Hook this Saturday August 6th. The Caravan is an international non-profit dance organization that promotes peace and unity. But this is no ordinary show. In fact, it’s a one-day festival with multiple artists, workshops, experiences and wellness services. The Hudson Valley Flamenco Festival will present itself with a performance among aerial flights and trapeze work, skincare and yoga workshops, and more than a dozen other attractions. Doors open at 1 p.m. and close at 7 p.m., and admission is by donation (suggested $25 for students/children and $35 for adults). Reserve your spot in advance at www.vanavercaravan.org/tickets/summerfest.

ten

Raise the dead – Local rockabilly punk band Red Neckromancer make their long-awaited return to the stage this Saturday, August 6 at Keegan Ales. Kind of an underground supergroup, we haven’t seen them in these parts for over two years. No word on what brought them out of hiding, but we’re guessing it has something to do with whiskey and zombies. If you like brutal chants and fried country freakouts, be there at 7 p.m.

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John Aielli, longtime voice of Austin mornings on KUT and KUTX, has died https://deimel.biz/john-aielli-longtime-voice-of-austin-mornings-on-kut-and-kutx-has-died/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 22:18:45 +0000 https://deimel.biz/john-aielli-longtime-voice-of-austin-mornings-on-kut-and-kutx-has-died/ John Aielli, the sweet and idiosyncratic narrator of morning commutes for generations of Austinites, has died. The longtime local radio host was 76. “We are heartbroken to report that our beloved friend and colleague John Aielli passed away shortly before 8 a.m. this morning,” Austin stations KUT and KUTX said in a statement Sunday. “It […]]]>

John Aielli, the sweet and idiosyncratic narrator of morning commutes for generations of Austinites, has died. The longtime local radio host was 76.

“We are heartbroken to report that our beloved friend and colleague John Aielli passed away shortly before 8 a.m. this morning,” Austin stations KUT and KUTX said in a statement Sunday. “It was such a joy to work with him, and so important to what KUT and KUTX have become.”

In recent years, Aielli had suffered several health issues, including a heart attack in 2012 and a stroke in 2020. After the latter, Aielli retired from regular on-air duties at the station.

From 2012:Conversations with John Aielli of KUT

Longtime KUT/KUTX radio personality John Aielli, featured here on the station in 2012, had suffered several health issues in recent years.

During his tenure with KUT and KUTX – more than half a century – the classically trained baritone and his show “Eklektikos” have ushered the city into a new day, with everything from classical to classic rock. A beloved Austin character, he was one of the public radio station’s top fundraisers, as well as a liaison force between listeners and community arts organizations. For years, he hosted the station’s beloved holiday tunes at the Capitol.

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Frederick Douglass gets the Hamilton treatment with a new musical | American theater https://deimel.biz/frederick-douglass-gets-the-hamilton-treatment-with-a-new-musical-american-theater/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 08:05:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/frederick-douglass-gets-the-hamilton-treatment-with-a-new-musical-american-theater/ For Kenneth Morrissitting in a dark theater among hundreds of people, it was a moment of communion with a man he has never met but whose light he takes with him wherever he goes. Morris is the great-great-great-grandson of Frederick Douglass, an abolitionist, orator and polymath. On Thursday, he joined a Washington audience that included […]]]>

For Kenneth Morrissitting in a dark theater among hundreds of people, it was a moment of communion with a man he has never met but whose light he takes with him wherever he goes.

Morris is the great-great-great-grandson of Frederick Douglass, an abolitionist, orator and polymath. On Thursday, he joined a Washington audience that included Supreme Court Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson for the world premiere of American propheta musical fueled by the speeches and writings of Douglass.

Morris was especially happy to see the show spotlight his great-great-great-grandmother Anna Murray Douglass who, despite being married to the anti-slavery activist for 44 years, has been overlooked in her writings and sometimes disparaged by historians.

“It’s so beautiful to see my ancestors come to life on stage,” Morris said after the performance at arena scene ended with a standing ovation. “It’s been a long-standing complaint in my family that Anna has not been given the dignity and respect she deserves in history. There would be no Frederick Douglass without her.

The 60-year-old, who sat next to his mother, Nettie Washington Douglass, added: “It’s really moving to be able to see my ancestors. Their blood runs through my veins.

American Prophet is the latest marker of a revival of Douglass In popular culture. The story of how he escaped slavery as a young man to become a leading thinker, orator and star – the most photographed man of the 19th century – has been told in an award-winning biography the Pulitzer Prize by David Blight in 2018 and his speeches featured in an HBO documentary film earlier this year.

Cornelius Smith Jr as Frederick Douglass in American Prophet. Photography: Arena Stage

This suggests that former US President Donald Trump got his times mixed up, but wasn’t entirely wrong when he observed: “Frederick Douglass is an example of someone who has done an incredible job and is more and more recognized, I notice it.”

Now Douglass has the Hamilton treatment – ​​sort of. Development of the American Prophet started in 2015the same year that Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hip-hop-influenced musical about the Founding Fathers debuted and caused a stir.

Like Hamilton, the show features a president (in this case Abraham Lincoln) bursting into song, a score (by Marcus Hummon) that crosses style barriers, and a meditation on legacy and “telling your story” (Anna , noting that her husband’s name will be remembered in history, asks, “But is mine? Is mine?”)

But while Hamilton has been criticized in recent years for understating slavery in national origins history, American Prophet brings the issue to the fore. There are flashbacks to Douglass’ early days in slavery when Anna (Kristolyn Lloyd), an Underground Railroad conductor, encourages him to flee. “My children will not have a slave for a father,” she told him. “You are not a slave.”

At one point, Douglass (Cornelius Smith Jr.) recites his famous speech: “What, for the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer: a day which reveals to him, more than all the other days of the year, the gross injustice and the cruelty of which he is the constant victim.

Kristolyn Lloyd as Anna Murray Douglass in American Prophet.
Kristolyn Lloyd as Anna Murray Douglass in American Prophet. Photography: Arena Stage

And a call to action from Douglass is turned into a catchy musical number: “It’s not light we need, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but the thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind and the earthquake.” At the climax of the show, he addresses the audience directly and asks them to reflect on their contribution to justice. “Shake. Shake. Agitate!” he urges.

For Morris, who is president of Frederick Douglass Family Initiativesa nonprofit that fights human trafficking and racism, and worked as a consultant on the production, such a cry is more relevant than ever in the Washington of 2022.

He said: “His words 170 years later still resonate, sadly. There is still a lot of work to do. But we need his voice and we need to be inspired by the great freedom fighters who came before us because we live in a time when the country is as divided as it has long been with racist rhetoric, sexist and xenophobic who is there.

“In the 19th century, they ‘altered’ people of African descent to justify taking away their humanity and treating them inhumanely. They said things like, ‘They’re better off in slavery. Listen to the happy songs they sing. They get the Christian religion.

“When we think of making a group of people ‘another’, I think of things like ‘They’re coming to invade our country, they’re rapists or criminals’, justifying abusing a group of people so that their children can be caged in. History is not only about the past, but also about the present and the future as well.

The feelings were echoed by Charles Randolph-Wright, director and co-writer of the show. After Thursday night’s performance, Randolph-Wright took the stage and said, “It’s so important that we find a way to communicate and that’s what we hope with this play, that all of you, each one of you, come out and wave cause that’s what we have to do we have no choice we need the fire like Frederick told us 170 years ago.”

He added: “At a time when Critical Race Theory, Frederick Douglass and Anna Murray Douglass will not be taught in schools, we need to find the way it is taught, that they get to know these amazing people. And there are so many who have done this, so many women who have always been ignored in the movement. It is imperative that we see and hear them now.”

Douglass was born in 1818, escaped slavery in 1838, and became a leading abolitionist, conveying the horror of his first-hand experience to the public and touring Britain and Ireland.

American Prophet is set between 1851 and 1865 with flashbacks to his past. It charts Douglass’ complicated interactions with abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, extremist John Brown and President Lincoln, whose assassination on Thursday night prompted an audience member to exclaim, “Oh, shit!”

In a Zoom interview this week, Randolph-Wright, 65, said, “Hamilton just blew the door down on what we could do, especially for young audiences to want to experience the story. I hope we can do the same with this storytelling and I hope people will be hungry for it. We need to understand where we have been to know where we are and where we are going.

The musical was originally scheduled to be staged in the summer of 2020 but was postponed by the coronavirus pandemic. Randolph-Wright added, “My view of this show is dramatically different now in 2022 than it was in 2020.

Cornelius Smith Jr as Frederick Douglass and the cast of American Prophet.
Cornelius Smith Jr as Frederick Douglass and the cast of American Prophet. Photography: Arena Stage

“Being in Washington when everything is going on with January 6, with the Supreme Court – we’re rehearsing and trying to come in and do this work and all of this around us is madness. That’s what was happening around Frederick and he dealt with it and tried to figure out what the answer was. The answer changes.

Randolph-Wright, who comes from a long line of civil rights activists, found Douglass’ words both beautiful and prescient. “They’re what he wrote about 170 years ago and we’re still dealing with that, especially what people of color are dealing with every day in this country, what women are dealing with, all of that .

“Those words still resonate so strongly. I’ve had friends come to this show before and they’re like, ‘You wrote them, didn’t you?’ I’m like, ‘No, no, that’s his speech word for word.'”

The words also struck a chord with the opening night audience at Arena Stage. Jamie Stiehm, 61, columnist and historian who studied Douglass, said the music format worked: “It was so passionate, it was so serious, it wasn’t lighthearted or whimsical. It didn’t trivialize anything. It ended on this note of ‘we need the fire’ and ‘bustle’. I thought the actors brought this to life and he himself would have been happy with the production.

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Spotify kills the car thing https://deimel.biz/spotify-kills-the-car-thing/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 09:53:21 +0000 https://deimel.biz/spotify-kills-the-car-thing/ And finally Business News Digital By Andy Malt | Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2022 Spotify’s car is dead. The streaming service announced in its second-quarter earnings report yesterday that it had stopped manufacturing the device that allowed users to stream music in their car. It was in 2019 that Spotify first launched the gadget, […]]]>

And finally Business News Digital

By Andy Malt | Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2022

Spotify’s car is dead. The streaming service announced in its second-quarter earnings report yesterday that it had stopped manufacturing the device that allowed users to stream music in their car.

It was in 2019 that Spotify first launched the gadget, initially by invitation only for research purposes – with the company saying its first proprietary hardware product was primarily “developed to help us learn more about how which people listen to music and podcasts”. ”.

However, two years later, the thing – still called Car Thing – went on sale to anyone who wanted it in the United States. And as recently as April this year, a whole bunch of new features were added to it.

Spotify said in a statement to Engadget that “several factors” had led to the recent decision to discontinue the product. Although one of the key things seems to be that – despite Spotify saying in 2021 that it was making it more widely available due to “a need from our users” – few people actually wanted one.

After all, many newer cars now have access to in-dash music streaming. And for everyone else, rather than using a special smartphone-like device to access Spotify in the car, they could probably just, you know, use their smartphone.

In its earnings report, Spotify admitted that its overall gross margin was “negatively impacted by our decision to stop manufacturing Car Thing”, but this was “partially offset by a positive change in prior period estimates. for the liabilities of rightsholders”. Adorable stuff.

Despite the device’s failure, Spotify told Engadget that it had nonetheless “unlocked useful lessons” from Car Thing over the past three years, and the car remains an “important place” for audio.

For now, Spotify will continue to support existing Car Thing devices, and you can buy yourself one of those left in the Spotify warehouse for the bargain price of $49.99 (previously $89.99) failing, useless gadgets are your thing.

Some thought in 2019 that Car Thing might be Spotify’s first step to becoming active in making and selling its own digital music gear. But, alas, apparently not.

The company will only focus on selling boring old premium subscriptions I guess. Although the number of premium subscribers still increased by six million in the last quarter, so there is at least growing consumer demand for these. For now at least.



LEARN MORE ON: Spotify


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Disability Pride Month Celebrates the Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act https://deimel.biz/disability-pride-month-celebrates-the-anniversary-of-the-americans-with-disabilities-act/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 07:59:09 +0000 https://deimel.biz/disability-pride-month-celebrates-the-anniversary-of-the-americans-with-disabilities-act/ Carson Pickett, who was born without a forearm or left hand, became the first person without a limb to make the United States Women’s National Soccer Team in 2022. (© Rick Bowmer/AP Images) There is an estimate 1 billion people with disabilities in the world. Their contributions benefit everyone. In the United States, July is […]]]>

Carson Pickett, who was born without a forearm or left hand, became the first person without a limb to make the United States Women’s National Soccer Team in 2022. (© Rick Bowmer/AP Images)

There is an estimate 1 billion people with disabilities in the world. Their contributions benefit everyone.

In the United States, July is Disability Pride Month. It marks the 1990 enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act, a landmark US rights law that expanded civil rights protections to people with disabilities and ensured that all Americans would benefit from their talents.

“To me, Disability Pride is a lot of things,” said Jessica Ping-Wild, an American blogger who lives in London. “It’s a chance for people with disabilities to declare their intrinsic valuesomething that is not often done by people outside the community.

ADA Commemoration

Jessica Lopez, center, takes part in the first Disability Pride Parade in 2015 in New York City. (© Seth Wenig/AP Images)

The first official celebration of Disability Pride was held in 2015 to commemorate the ADA’s 25th anniversary. The landmark legislation was signed on July 26, 1990.

The ADA prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in all areas of public life and enables their full participation in society – working, going to school, using public and private transportation services, by voting, buying goods and services or accessing public places. [See a timeline of some landmark events and legislation leading up to the passage of the ADA.]

In July, community members celebrate their contributions to society and defend their legal rights. Several American cities hold parades to recognize the community.

Awareness through a flag

Red, gold, white, blue and green stripes on a dark background extending from top left to bottom right (public domain)
The Disability Pride flag (public domain)

The Disability Pride Flag helps increase the visibility of the community. Ann Magill designed the flag in 2019 with feedback from community members. She then worked with photosensitive people to produce a more accessible version.

Five diagonal stripes of different colors lie on a black background. The Black Field mourns the victims of violence and abuse against people with disabilities. The diagonal suggests overcoming the barriers that separate people with disabilities from society.

The five colors of the flag represent different types of disability: red (physical disability), gold (neurodivergence), white (invisible and undiagnosed disability), blue (psychiatric disability) and green (sensory disability).

Make sense of business

By empowering people with disabilities, the ADA has also strengthens the US economy. Consider these numbers:

  • According to Accenture, companies prioritizing disability inclusion have had 28% higher revenues and 30% higher profit margins.
  • People with disabilities, along with their family members and caregivers, account for $2 trillion in annual disposable income.
  • The exclusion of people with disabilities from the workplace leads to losses of up to 7% of gross domestic product, according to the International Labor Organization.

The U.S. government is doing its part to ensure that U.S. diplomacy and foreign assistance support people with disabilities around the world. Sara Minkara is the United States Special Advisor on International Disability Rights, traveling the world to discuss how the full inclusion of persons with disabilities benefits society.

Full inclusion of all State Department employees, with and without disabilities, is a critical part of the efforts of the Office of the Secretary of Diversity and Inclusion, led by Ambassador Gina Abercrombie WinstanleyDirector of Diversity and Inclusion.

The Department of State also supports Mobility International USA National Center for Disability Information and Exchange and its work to increase the number of people with disabilities participating in international exchange programs.

Showcasing talent

Smiling black woman holding a cane (© Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images)
The award-winning artist known as Lachi helped start the disability advocacy group called RAMPD, which stands for Recording Artists and Music Professionals with Disabilities. Lachi, above in April, was born with congenital visual impairment. (©Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images)

People with disabilities continue to make historic contributions in many fields such as music, science, sports and technology.

Ralph Braun, an entrepreneur with muscular dystrophy, is considered the “father of the mobility movement” for his ideas that led to the invention of wheelchair lifts, wheelchair accessible vans and motorized scooters.

Notable scientists include the “father of the light bulb” Thomas Edison, who lost his hearing. Physicist stephen hawkingsuffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, changed our view of the universe.

Stephen Hawking in a business suit sitting in a wheelchair (© Matt Dunham/AP Images)
British physicist Stephen Hawking at the Opening Ceremony of the London 2012 Paralympic Games (© Matt Dunham/AP Images)

In sport, the Paralympics showcase the talents of people with disabilities every four years. Off the field, athletes advocate for inclusion, access and fairness. Elite American athletes, including gymnast Simone Biles and professional basketball star Kevin Love, help break the stigma of mental illness acknowledging their own struggles and raising awareness of the conditions that affect millions around the world.

On the American football field, defenseman Carson Pickett became the first limbless person to serve on the United States women’s national soccer team this year. “I hope to encourage anyone who struggles with their member difference to not be ashamed of who they are,” Pickett said.

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Bridgewater watch to see; challenge of local theater issues https://deimel.biz/bridgewater-watch-to-see-challenge-of-local-theater-issues/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 16:02:27 +0000 https://deimel.biz/bridgewater-watch-to-see-challenge-of-local-theater-issues/ It’s summer, so here’s an easy read, updating you on local entertainment news. Clarks back in Bridgewater The Clarks have announced that their annual concert at Bridgewater’s Thursdays Tavern will take place on August 19. Paper tickets are available now on Thursdays for $20, and coming soon to eventbrite.com where a $2 service fee is […]]]>
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