Music shop – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 17:54:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deimel.biz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music shop – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ 32 32 Gary Allan can’t wait to return to Floore’s Country Store https://deimel.biz/gary-allan-cant-wait-to-return-to-floores-country-store/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 17:50:48 +0000 https://deimel.biz/gary-allan-cant-wait-to-return-to-floores-country-store/ “It’s kind of like playing in someone’s backyard. A banging backyard where he knows everyone in the whole neighborhood and more,” said Allan, who has performed at legendary dance hall Helotes every year since. about 25 years old. “It’s always very crowded, and there’s so much history there.” Allan, whose hits include “Nothing On But […]]]>

“It’s kind of like playing in someone’s backyard. A banging backyard where he knows everyone in the whole neighborhood and more,” said Allan, who has performed at legendary dance hall Helotes every year since. about 25 years old. “It’s always very crowded, and there’s so much history there.”

Allan, whose hits include “Nothing On But the Radio” and “Every Storm (Runs Out of Rain)”, will return to Floore’s on Saturday night. The show is part of his tour in support of “Ruthless”, his first album in more than eight years. The album is his last for UMG Nashville, his longtime label. He announced on social media in July that they had separated and promised more news soon.

During the break between albums, Allan said, he continued to record, amassing a lot of material.

“Every time I returned something, the label didn’t think they could put it on the radio,” he said. “So we pushed back and tried different things, and so it’s a whole bunch of projects rolled into one. Which makes it fun because it makes it stronger.”

On ExpressNews.com: SA Stock Show & Rodeo 2023 concert lineup includes Keith Urban, Carly Pearce

Where: Floore’s Country Store, 14492 Old Bandera Road, Helotes

When: Doors open at 7 p.m. Saturday. Jack Ingram opens at 8:30 a.m. and takes the stage at 10 a.m.

Tickets: $35 general admission in advance and $40 on Saturdays; VIP tickets $125 to $175 per person for tables of four, liveatfloores.com.


To determine the order of the songs on the album, Allan did what he usually does: he wrote the titles on torn pieces of paper towel, left them on a counter at home, and rearranged them without cease. He also listened to a CD of the songs over and over again.

“Some things get louder the more you hear them, and some songs you get bored of pretty quickly, and I try to fade them out,” he said. “I learned a long time ago that if I don’t like it, it’s all over.”

Miss Patsy Cline, the ridiculously adorable black and white dog he adopted earlier this year, joins Allan on some dates of the tour. His dog Lucy, a Goldendoodle who died last year, also often accompanied him on the road.

“It makes your bus a little intimate,” he said, adding that Miss Patsy Cline is “a super cuddly dog, and when you get tired of petting her, she just moves on to the next person.”

The “Ruthless” tour marks Allan’s return to performing after the pandemic forced him on hiatus. He and his girlfriend, Molly Martin, spent the lockdown at first locked in his house, then joined a friend in the Dominican Republic.

“He had a 100ft yacht and he was towing a 30ft fishing boat, and we just went to live on a boat and caught fish and stayed away from everyone,” he said. “It was a to-do list.”

Martin is now his fiancée. He posted photos of the proposal on Instagram in December.

On ExpressNews.com: Gabriel “Fluffy” Iglesias is back in San Antonio

“We don’t have a date yet,” he said. “I think we’ll just run away. I think we’ll pick a vacation spot we like and go get married.”

The images he posted included a photo of the ring, a stunner with a pear-shaped diamond that he designed himself. He and his daughter have a custom jewelry business and they make a lot of engagement rings. They also sell pieces that reference Allan’s music, including pendants featuring a skeleton cowboy atop a skeleton bronco, the cover image of “Ruthless.”

“I think I always wanted to be a jeweler,” he said. “I had a time where I was away for a year – I was renegotiating with my record company, so there was really nothing I could do. I went to a stone setting school and in a jewelry school. I learned to melt silver and gold. So we do everything at home.

“It’s something I like to do at night. I always feel creative and it keeps me from making music.”

dlmartin@express-news.net | Twitter: @DeborahMartinFR

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People’s Music in Sevastopol closes its doors after almost 50 years https://deimel.biz/peoples-music-in-sevastopol-closes-its-doors-after-almost-50-years/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 17:00:48 +0000 https://deimel.biz/peoples-music-in-sevastopol-closes-its-doors-after-almost-50-years/ After nearly 50 years, People’s Music – a quaint shop on Sevastopol’s main street where many locals bought their first guitars or took their first banjo lessons – is closing, marking the end of an era for the community. In a market that values ​​the convenience of music streaming and online shopping, Alex Bryant and […]]]>

After nearly 50 years, People’s Music – a quaint shop on Sevastopol’s main street where many locals bought their first guitars or took their first banjo lessons – is closing, marking the end of an era for the community.

In a market that values ​​the convenience of music streaming and online shopping, Alex Bryant and Laurie Meade, co-owners of Main Street’s oldest company, decided it was time to face reality and move on. their online store.

Their last business day at the physical location is August 31.

“It was a struggle. Rent keeps going up, margins keep going down and we can’t compete with the internet at this point,” said Meade, 60.

The store was more than a place to buy new instruments and take music lessons. It was also a second home for a variety of local and regional musicians, known and unknown, like Tom Waits, Sean Lennon, Steve Kimock, Les Claypool and others who just love playing music.

“This store is a music community,” Bryant, 60, said. “It’s inspiring to hear why people come to the store and to see people’s reactions to the instruments.

“We will miss it,” he added.

People’s Music was founded in 1973 as a record store by original owners Jane and Duane Phillips. In 1986 Bryant’s father, Bo, a four-string banjo player who ran a music store in San Rafael for many years, bought the store and expanded it, adding more musical instruments to the store’s collection.

In 2015, Bryant and his wife, Laurie Meade, decided to take over and operate the store with their son, Ryan, and longtime employees Chris Carney, Hoytus Rolen and Mark Hogan.

In addition to juggling the time and energy they devote to their store, Meade and Bryant also work full time. Bryant works for a software developer and Meade is a freelance consultant for various companies.

They even dipped into their savings for a few months to keep the business going.

“It’s always been a service to the community,” Bryant said. “We are like a charity or non-profit; we are something people need, but nobody pays for it. There is not enough business to support this store.

After their lease ends in December, he plans to move the items from the store to a barn, where he will continue instrument repairs. With the planned online store, they may be emphasizing their vintage and ethnic instruments, including a kora (African harp), koto (Japanese harp), and banjos, among others.

“The business will kind of exist as a clandestine, underground music store,” Bryant said.

Although a chapter closes, the show must go on. Bryant is thinking of ways to continue sales while staying connected to the store’s community — keeping the business going through pop-ups at local grower’s markets and events, offering his instrument repair services, announcing big sales on social media and continuing to answer questions about repairs or instruments by text or phone.

“We want to make the website more organic,” Bryant said. “Make it more human. I don’t know exactly how we’re going to do that yet.

One of the things Bryant will miss the most is the connections he made with customers as people peruse CDs and test drive multiple guitars at the store to find their perfect instrument.

“Not everything will translate digitally,” Bryant said. “There’s nothing like seeing a child hear something for the first time and letting people smell and play instruments before they buy it.”

Like other businesses in Sonoma County and around the world, People’s Music has been forced to temporarily close and lay off employees during the pandemic. But, according to Bryant, there was an upside.

“People have really made the effort to shop online more than ever,” Bryant said.

During the first pandemic lockdown in 2020, people started taking up new hobbies including learning to play music. Customers were picking up their orders at the store and their son Ryan was driving around Sonoma County to drop off the orders.

However, sales began to slow as COVID-19 restrictions eased and people gave up on new hobbies, Bryant said.

New chapter

The store closure affects not only long-time customers, but also employees who have dedicated their lives to People’s Music.

Carney, 74, has worked at the store for 35 years, repairing acoustic string instruments, running the store and giving music lessons. He said he expected this development but was not prepared for it.

“It’s a sad end to an era,” Carney said as he repaired a harp with missing strings in his repair room at the store. I never had to look for another job. It’s my second home.

“I will miss it very much,” he added.

On June 27, Bryant announced the store’s upcoming closure on Facebook. Fans immediately responded with notes of appreciation for People’s Music.

One of the commentators, Shannon Elsom, 49, started taking guitar lessons at the store in 2018. She bought her first electric guitar there and also learned some life lessons, she said.

“It was a place where I could be supported and explore my creativity,” said Elsom, who now lives in Michigan. “(People’s Music employee) Hoytus not only taught me how to play, he taught me life lessons. I hope this reroute will take them to beautiful places.

One of the store’s pianos, which stood outside for more than a year, turned into a meeting space for strangers and children, who painted on the piano and sprinkled fresh plants and flowers on it and around.

“The community has made it their own,” Bryant said.

Recently, the piano found a new home, in a Cazadero barn where it will be available for Airbnb travelers to play and enjoy.

“When one chapter closes, another opens,” said Hogan, 70, who started teaching at the store in 2006. “It feels more like a funeral than a layoff.”

You can reach editor Mya Constantino at mya.constantino@pressdemocrat.com. @searchingformya on Twitter.

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Fall Contemporary Music Preview | the new yorker https://deimel.biz/fall-contemporary-music-preview-the-new-yorker/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 10:06:02 +0000 https://deimel.biz/fall-contemporary-music-preview-the-new-yorker/ After a buzzing summer slate that saw many stars return to bigger indoor stages, the fall schedule continues to deliver, with even more options and plenty of artists performing back-to-back gigs to satisfy eager fans. Brooklyn Steel hosts an exciting and diverse collection of shows. On October 1, the twins behind Ibeyi share their moving […]]]>

After a buzzing summer slate that saw many stars return to bigger indoor stages, the fall schedule continues to deliver, with even more options and plenty of artists performing back-to-back gigs to satisfy eager fans.

Brooklyn Steel hosts an exciting and diverse collection of shows. On October 1, the twins behind Ibeyi share their moving experimental soul. The recently reunited avant-pop group Stereolab explores twenty years of post-rock jamming over two nights (October 10-11), and the soft-spoken Compton native Canal Tres tinkers with his mix of West Coast rap and house music (October 15). On October 28, the laid-back British pop musician beabadoobee presents his second album, “Beatopia”. And, on November 8, Nashville-based singer-songwriter Sophie Allison unveils “Sometimes, Forever” produced by OPN, her latest album as a Soccer Mom.

At Radio City Music Hall, pop divas of all generations grace the stage: the dance icon Diana Ross brings her decades of pageantry (September 13), the flamenco innovator Rosalia made two stops along it”MOTOMAMI” world tour (September 18-19), and the multimedia scholar Lil Nas X continues to milk her debut album, “Montero” (September 20-21). Stadium shows feature a colorful range of music, mostly focused on movement. The baroque-pop outfit Florence and the machine celebrates its first album in four years, “Dance Fever”, at Madison Square Garden (September 16-17). A few days later, on September 20, the reggaetón pioneer Daddy Yankee performed there during his farewell tour. For electronic dance enthusiasts, English djs and producers Jamie xx and Four Tet play at Forest Hills Stadium (September 23). And Gorillaz, Damon Albarn’s virtual project, best known as the frontman of Blur, moves to the Barclays Center (October 12).

Elsewhere, the unconventional sounds of off-center musicians find refuge: at the Bowery Ballroom, the American gothic artist Ethel Cain (September 9-10) and the jazz-fusion group led by Shabaka Hutchings The comet is coming (Oct. 19) play; Terminal 5 ships the suicide rapper Denzel Curry (October 6); BAM‘s Howard Gilman Opera House Welcomes Experimental Founder of Brainfeeder flying lotus (6-7 Oct); and Webster Hall presents emerging punk endorsed by Travis Barker KennyHoopla (Oct. 14), the sludge-pop group let’s eat grandma (November 4) and the elegant synth-pop duo Magdalen Bay (Nov. 15). ♦

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How Musician Aeryn Goldstein Would Have a Perfect Day in DC https://deimel.biz/how-musician-aeryn-goldstein-would-have-a-perfect-day-in-dc/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/how-musician-aeryn-goldstein-would-have-a-perfect-day-in-dc/ In DC Dream Day, we ask our favorite people in the area to tell us how they would spend a perfect day in the District. Aeryn Goldstein practically grew up in the DC area’s DIY music scene, playing in garage bands as she grew up. Now, she is training the next generation of musicians as […]]]>

In DC Dream Day, we ask our favorite people in the area to tell us how they would spend a perfect day in the District.

Aeryn Goldstein practically grew up in the DC area’s DIY music scene, playing in garage bands as she grew up. Now, she is training the next generation of musicians as an elementary school music teacher for Prince George’s County Public Schools. “I love nostalgia,” Goldstein says. “Most of my songs are about stories from when I was in high school. That’s why I teach. I’m like a big kid.

Goldstein, who grew up in Berwyn Heights, fronts the energetic, horn-laden rock band Professor Goldstein, who just released an EP, “The Fork Universe of Funky Love”, on local non-profit label This Could Go Boom! “This record is actually about my experiences in the DMV DIY scene,” says Goldstein, who cites Weezer, Ben Gibbard and DC hardcore legend J. Robbins as influences.

The 26-year-old’s Hyattsville home doubles as a DIY venue, which she runs with teammate Venkatesh Ananth Batni. The Classroom, as it is aptly named, is equipped to record and stream YouTube shows: lively local post-rock band spring money recorded there, and Goldstein and Batni recently live-streamed a series of Linkin Park covers (which she shared with her students). Goldstein studied music education at Towson University and has just completed his first full year of elementary school teaching. “I can play all the instruments up to sixth grade level,” she says.

Her dream day reflects her musical inclinations, her love for Prince George’s County and the energy she describes as a “big kid.” “It’s a mix, really, of all the best times I’ve had,” Goldstein says.

We will get on the bike and head to Greenbelt. We enter from Crescent Road, cross Buddy Attick Lake Park, then head to the Roosevelt Center and have breakfast at New Deal Cafe. This is where I played my very first concert, when I was 12 or 13 years old. I had been playing drums for two weeks, and we were playing Van Halen and Led Zeppelin covers, like you do when you’re that age. I take a bagel with coffee. Nothing fancy, just black coffee and Tofutti cream cheese on an all bagel provided by the co-op just across the street.

I hang out at the Roosevelt Center. I practically grew up there. What my siblings and I used to say is we live in Greenbelt but sleep in Berwyn Heights because we all went to school in Greenbelt and we all worked in Greenbelt . I get out of the manuscript paper, I start writing stuff. I have my guitar on my back, so I rip chords and write something that will maybe form a melody.

Let’s take Route 1 back and cycle up to College Park. We are passing CDepot. This is where I bought my first CDs. I’m a sucker for nostalgia, but I gave away all my CDs from my childhood. I actually have a spreadsheet of all the albums I’ve browsed and actively listened to. I’ll pull this up and see if they have any. I’ll pick up some of the early albums I bought, like Linkin Park’s ‘Minutes to Midnight’, Brad Paisley’s ‘American Saturday Night’, Green Day’s ‘American Idiot’. Any of those early formative albums.

We will continue to cycle north to Beltsville. We will go to Atomic Music. The people there are the best, love them, super helpful. When they try out instruments, they know what you’re looking for. I’m going to trade in my old guitar for something less janky sounding. Probably a Taylor, something with a nice warm sound. I bought my first guitar and my first drums there.

Let’s get an appetite. I want to cycle part of the Anacostia trail network. We’ll head back down Route 1 to the University of Maryland campus and then enter the Anacostia trail system across Lake Artemesia to Hyattsville. Biking along the Anacostia is beautiful in itself. I love this river.

We have lunch at Shagga Cafe and Restaurant. It’s a great Ethiopian place. I have to get a large vegetable platter with lentils, beets and collard greens. I’ve been going there forever.

Let’s enter the city through the West Hyattsville subway station. We are going to natural History Museum. I love the dinosaur exhibit so much. I went there a week after they reopened. I made sure to go through it in order of geological time, and as soon as I saw this diplodocus skeleton, I was reminded of 1999 when I first entered this museum. I had to sit down and started crying. It’s so moving! There’s a lot more focus on weird animals that evolved during the Triassic period now. I loved that they brought light to these because they are some of my favorite prehistoric megafauna.

Let’s hit a bar: the Dewdrop Inn. I love this place and have played a lot of gigs there. I’ll see if they have music. If not, there’s probably karaoke. I played the “I only listen to nu metal” thing, so I’ll either do Rob Zombie’s “Dragula” or Limp Bizkit’s “Rollin'”. Nu metal is going so strong. Rockers don’t know how to have fun anymore. I love DC Brau Pilsners, so I’ll take one.

We will return to Hyattsville and go to franklin. I went to synagogue with the owner growing up. I go there a lot. I’m going to get some mushroom tacos. Probably also a house lager. We have to stop at their general store. You have the usual general store stuff, like candy, soda, all that stuff, but you also have gag gifts, like weird socks, which are my favorite. There are dirty fridge magnets. It’s all so close you can’t walk through it all – I tried.

Let’s take the friends DC9. We are going to see Spring Silver. Love them. We will also see the Neckbeards. They’re an emo band from southern Maryland, but they play here a lot. This is possibly my favorite band in the state of Maryland. Also Sheila: a pop-rock band from NoVa. I love seeing bands there. I love that it’s open, there’s room to dance, and I’m a sucker for a good old rooftop bar.

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Ownership of Ernest Tubb Record Store Sold, Hope of Preservation Renewed https://deimel.biz/ownership-of-ernest-tubb-record-store-sold-hope-of-preservation-renewed/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 01:27:51 +0000 https://deimel.biz/ownership-of-ernest-tubb-record-store-sold-hope-of-preservation-renewed/ The iconic Ernest Tubb Record Shop on Lower Broadway in Nashville has been officially sold to a group of investors for $18.3 million, along with the Record Shop’s current contents, including inventory and fixtures in a deal separated for an undisclosed amount. The new owners are Nashville-based real estate investor, developer and former NFL player […]]]>

The iconic Ernest Tubb Record Shop on Lower Broadway in Nashville has been officially sold to a group of investors for $18.3 million, along with the Record Shop’s current contents, including inventory and fixtures in a deal separated for an undisclosed amount. The new owners are Nashville-based real estate investor, developer and former NFL player Brad Bars, Russian-born Nashville studio musician Ilya Toshinskiy, and Ernest Dale Tubb III, who is a businessman based in the Nashville area, as well as Ernest Tubb’s grandson.

The landmark of country music had become embroiled in a legal dispute between former owner David McCormick and new owners JesseLee Jones and Emily Ann Cousins, who also own the honky tonk Robert’s Western World on Lower Broadway. Jones and Cousins ​​purchased the property from David McCormick in 2020. What at first seemed like the perfect deal to preserve the property and business by transferring it to JesseLee Jones ended up with the respective parties announcing the closing of the Ernest Tubb Record Shop, and putting it up for sale.

“It is with great sadness that we announce the news of the sale of the Ernest Tubb record store – building and trade -,” he added. the March 11 statement said conclusively. “Due to changed circumstances beyond our control, it is now clear that the best course of action is to sell the business and the real estate.”

The $18.3 million price tag for the historic 3-story building and the 0.08-acre parcel it sits on equates to about $2,000 per square foot, which, according to the Nashville Post, is in line with recent offers for similar properties. JesseLee Jones and Emily Ann Cousins ​​bought the same property for about 1/3 that price in 2020, for $4.75 million. David McCormick bought the building and property for $128,000 in 1992 when Lower Broadway was at its lowest after the Ryman Auditorium closed.

The most pressing question for many country music fans and conservatives alike is what the plan is for the historic building and iconic Ernest Tubb Record Shop. Saving Country Music attempted to contact the three new owners to comment on their plans for the property after the deal was announced on Friday (7-29) afternoon, but did not hear back at the time of this post.

However, with the investment group including both a musician and a direct heir and namesake of Ernest Tubb, this should give those concerned about the future of the property and the business some cautious assurance. Including Ernest Dale Tubb III in the deal at least gives him a connection to the Ernest Tubb family.

Ilya Toshinskiy is one of Nashville’s most prolific current studio musicians, having performed on recordings by George Strait, Brooks & Dunn, Blake Shelton and more. Playing guitar, mandolin, dobro, banjo and other instruments, Toshinskiy is a two-time Academy Award winner for Country Music Player of the Year (Specialty Instruments), a five-time MusicRow Best Guitarist and was nominated for CMA Musician of the Year. The 44-year-old also has his own band named Bering Strait.

Toshinskiy has also dabbled in real estate investing in recent years, including buying property in the Nashville suburb of Berry Hill and turning it into five townhouses, as well as buying a small office building. downtown in March for $2,725,000 to also be converted into residences.

Real estate investor Brad Bars played briefly for the New York Giants in the NFL and has been involved in several development projects in Nashville over the past few years, including paying $4 million for a 2.37-acre property near of Tennessee State University housing 46 apartments. units.

What we do know is that the new ownership group will not be able to demolish or significantly alter the historic Ernest Tubb Record Shop building at 417 Broadway, which, among other uses, once housed a Civil War hospital. In a interview with Saving Country Music in April, Nashville Subway Historic Commission Executive Director W. Tim Walker said the structure was protected by historic designation.

“It’s in a local historic overlay district. It is in the Broadway Historic Preservation District, which stretches from 1st to 5th Avenue and includes all properties on both sides of the street,” said W. Tim Walker. “The building cannot be demolished. It is a contributory or historic building to that local neighborhood.

Although former Ernest Tubb Record Shop owner David McCormick declined to comment directly to Saving Country Music on numerous occasions about the sale and purchase, while commenting on an article here on save country music on Sunday, May 8, he said: “On a lighter note, the record store will reopen.

Recording musician Cliff Gerken also said on May 9: “Hundreds of press articles… Thousands of fans… Multiple petitions… And wonderful people who love country music and have prayed for its legacy… Good news! The Ernest Tubb Record Store is not closing!! They will reopen soon!! Details to come!! »

Cliff Gerken then posted in part Friday night (7-29), “IT’S OVER!!! MY TWO YEAR NIGHTMARE IS OVER. RECORD SHOP WILL NOW BE IN GOOD HANDS WITH ERNEST TUBB, III. AN ORDER TO THE “BAD GUYS” TO HAND OVER THEIR KEYS.

Saving Country Music will continue to report on this developing story and the new ownership group’s construction and business plans as information becomes available and confirmed.

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First opened in 1947 on Commerce St. as a retail business for country legend Ernest Tubb, it moved to its most iconic location on Broadway in 1951. Frustrated with the lack of national records stocked in many retail establishments across the country, instead of complaining about Il, Ernest Tubb decided to do something about it, opening the store just around the corner from the Ryman Auditorium where the Grand Ole Opry was being held.

The place also became the venue for the Midnite Jamboree – the Opry’s official/unofficial afterparty every Saturday night. As the record store has become a landmark, the Midnite Jamboree has also become a cultural staple. This is where Loretta Lynn got her big break and dedicated a song to Patsy Cline as she lay in a hospital bed after a tragic car accident – just one of many legendary moments in the history of the country facilitated by the Ernest Tubb Record Shop and the Midnite Jamboree.

Soon the Ernest Tubb Record Stores and the Midnite Jamboree became national institutions. Several ET Record Shops opened across the country, including in Pigeon Forge, TN and Fort Worth, TX. The Midnite Jamboree aired on WSM in Nashville and simulcast in many markets.

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Gorillaz released a new music video ahead of the Sydney pop-up store https://deimel.biz/gorillaz-released-a-new-music-video-ahead-of-the-sydney-pop-up-store/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 00:43:14 +0000 https://deimel.biz/gorillaz-released-a-new-music-video-ahead-of-the-sydney-pop-up-store/ To celebrate the long-awaited return to Australia, Gorillaz have released a new single and will be opening a pop-up store in Sydney this weekend. While wowing crowds across the country with their first shows in Australia in 12 years, Gorillaz have released a new single cracker island and fans will have the chance to visit […]]]>

To celebrate the long-awaited return to Australia, Gorillaz have released a new single and will be opening a pop-up store in Sydney this weekend.

While wowing crowds across the country with their first shows in Australia in 12 years, Gorillaz have released a new single cracker island and fans will have the chance to visit a pop-up store in Sydney this Saturday, featuring never-before-seen merchandise.

The iconic animation group have played their sold-out arena tour across Australia and just when we thought it couldn’t get any better than this, they’re releasing an unreal music video (because it’s animated haha) for their new single Cracker Island with Thundercat.

The film’s clip is an eerie culmination of police lights and hallucinations and takes viewers on a nocturnal journey through Los Angeles.

After partnering with Nexus Studios to create this psychedelic experience, Murdoc said: “Think of it like the final scene of the movie, the shortly after the grand finale when the hero (me) is about to walk into the sunset, the credits rolling. That’s right, we’re starting at the end Why? BECAUSE I WORK IN A MYSTERIOUS WAY.

Cracker Island also features two-time Grammy-winning Thundercat, with production by incredible eight-time Grammy-winning multi-instrumentalist Greg Kurstin, alongside Gorillaz and Remi Kabaka Jr.

As this is the first time Gorillaz has been in the country since 2010, they have held an amazing pop-up store which will see Murdoc, Noodle, 2D and Russel take over 29 Australia Street in Camperdown this Saturday July 30 from 9am to 5 p.m.

Also be sure to arrive early and well as the first 100 attendees will receive a free Gorillaz face mask.

It’s safe to say that this Saturday will be one of those demon days.

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Out and About WRAL.com https://deimel.biz/out-and-about-wral-com/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 10:15:26 +0000 https://deimel.biz/out-and-about-wral-com/ Live Audio Tips Categories: Music, Shopping & Retail, Movies, Families & Parenting, Lifestyle, Electronics Visit their website Pricing information: 1 day pass: $20 // 3 day pass: $35 Ticket information:Register now at https://live.audioadvice.com/attend/register/ Whether you’re into high-performance audio, home theater, 2-channel, turntables, or headphones, Audio Advice Live is the only premium audio and video show […]]]>

Live Audio Tips

Categories: Music, Shopping & Retail, Movies, Families & Parenting, Lifestyle, Electronics

Visit their website

Pricing information: 1 day pass: $20 // 3 day pass: $35

Ticket information:Register now at https://live.audioadvice.com/attend/register/

Whether you’re into high-performance audio, home theater, 2-channel, turntables, or headphones, Audio Advice Live is the only premium audio and video show where you can experience it all. Meet the industry’s top experts, brands and influencers face-to-face and hear all the latest and greatest gear live and in person!

Audio Advice Live will bring together high performance audio enthusiasts and industry influencers to see and hear the world’s best audio and home theater brands including McIntosh, Sony, JBL, Bowers & Wilkins, JVC, Klipsch, SVS, KEF and many more. After.

Audio Advice Live will feature suite after suite of experience rooms filled with the best high-performance audio and home theater demos from over 60 brands showcasing the latest audio and theater gear. This three-day event provides an opportunity to meet the industry’s top experts and brands face-to-face and immerse yourself in music and video like never before. Discover the latest turntables, headphones, home cinema and home audio. Join the party and be the first to see brand new products from the brands that will be unveiled exclusively in the USA at the show.

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Music fans flock to the Four Seasons Mall in Mansfield as the HMV store brings live music to town with Reece Fell Over https://deimel.biz/music-fans-flock-to-the-four-seasons-mall-in-mansfield-as-the-hmv-store-brings-live-music-to-town-with-reece-fell-over/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 06:40:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/music-fans-flock-to-the-four-seasons-mall-in-mansfield-as-the-hmv-store-brings-live-music-to-town-with-reece-fell-over/ HMV’s Live and Local project was launched in 2019 and was created to showcase talent from across the country in its stores. Artists have a free slot to perform their music in front of customers. The project’s initial launch was short-lived in Mansfield due to the coronavirus pandemic, which saw retail stores temporarily close amid […]]]>

HMV’s Live and Local project was launched in 2019 and was created to showcase talent from across the country in its stores.

Artists have a free slot to perform their music in front of customers.

The project’s initial launch was short-lived in Mansfield due to the coronavirus pandemic, which saw retail stores temporarily close amid regional government restrictions – but returned on Saturday with a performance by better-known Reece Mee under the name Reece Fell Over.

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Reece Mee, known by his stage name – Reece Feel Over, performed original songs in front of a growing crowd of patrons.

The 30-year-old said: “When I saw there was an opportunity to play HMV, I just had to jump on it.

“It was pretty surreal to play in the same place I was looking for CDs when I was a teenager.

“Mansfield is full of musical talent that needs to be showcased.

“I really hope this inspires and encourages other musicians to come forward and play a show at HMV.”

Steven Coan, Assistant Store Manager Mansfield HMV, all smiles through Reece’s acoustic set.

And her performance was a treat for fans, shoppers and store staff alike.

Steven Coan, Assistant Store Manager at Mansfield HMV, said: “It’s great to have Live and Local back.

“We try to support local artists and spread the word.

“Artists can come on a Saturday, give a free concert, share their music and build an audience.

“You can enter the store or contact social media if you are interested – we will share more information about upcoming events and post information about all of Reece on our social media.

“It’s a great opportunity for local artists and just amazing that we can provide this support to the community.”

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Musician Daniel Vardy, from Meden Vale, supported the idea.

He said: “Reece is a genuine guy with genius lyrics.

“Live and Local is a great idea to get up-and-coming artists noticed by punters who obviously shop there for great music.

“Why not put the unsigned front and center and let people discover some real raw talent?”

Following his HMV set, Reece will perform a live acoustic set at Percy Picklepackers, Weekday Cross, Nottingham on Friday September 2.

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Know your town: A Pune shop bears witness to how the Mirajkars have been shaping music for decades https://deimel.biz/know-your-town-a-pune-shop-bears-witness-to-how-the-mirajkars-have-been-shaping-music-for-decades/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 16:29:53 +0000 https://deimel.biz/know-your-town-a-pune-shop-bears-witness-to-how-the-mirajkars-have-been-shaping-music-for-decades/ A sitar player takes a seat on the soft white mattress placed on a platform placed in the center of the stage. With the fingers lightly strumming the strings, the soft chords created the calm atmosphere of the recital to follow. The star of the show, the sitar, shines in all its glory, polished to […]]]>

A sitar player takes a seat on the soft white mattress placed on a platform placed in the center of the stage. With the fingers lightly strumming the strings, the soft chords created the calm atmosphere of the recital to follow. The star of the show, the sitar, shines in all its glory, polished to its beauty after a long journey from a pumpkin grown in the moist soils of Miraj, a town in the Sangli district of Maharashtra, to the stage. While modern technology has facilitated the creation of musical instruments today, one can only imagine the efforts Faridsaheb Mirajkar would have made in the 1850s as he engaged with sadhus in the forests, exchanging brass pots for perfect pumpkins, to make his sitars.

Following his example and true to his heritage, the Mirajkar family continues to make musical instruments to this day. Sajid Mirajkar, the seventh generation of the family currently manages the company.

Based in Budhwar Peth of Pune, Yusuf Mirajkar’s Musical was established in 1931 by Omarsaheb Mirajkar, Sajid’s grandfather. The family owns another store, IS Mirajkar’s Musical Shop, run by Sajid’s uncle in Pune. Their tradition of instrument making dates back to the 1850s, after the family migrated from Bijapur to Miraj near Sangli.

From weaponry to music

A family of artisans once involved in the manufacture of weapons, the Mirajkars in the 1850s were summoned by the noble Patwardhans of Sangli, who were the keepers of Fort Miraj, to perfect the dome of the tomb of Khaja Shamna Mira. Disappointed by all previous artisans, Faridsaheb Mirajkar’s impeccable skills impressed Patwardhan. “The Patwardhan family were impressed with our craftsmanship and granted us a land grant in Miraj so that we could establish our residence there,” says Sajid.

Faridsaheb Mirajkar, a self-taught sitar maker and the first of the family to adopt the craft, became so popular that the Raja of Miraj (Balasaheb II) placed restrictions on his travels and on meeting people inside. out of town lest he be lured.

As the conflicts in the region began to wane, the demand for arms also saw a gradual decline, which in turn affected Faridsaheb Mirajkar’s income. The Patwardhans were art lovers and regularly invited artists from all over India for performances. The instruments used often needed basic repair work and Faridsaheb, being a regular attendee at all these recitals, quickly picked up the basics. Slowly, with Patwardhan’s encouragement, Faridsaheb also began manufacturing instruments which were, until then, shipped to Calcutta for any basic maintenance, taking almost six months for the instruments to be returned.

From Miraj to Pune

“Prabhat Studios is the reason we first entered Pune and V Shantaram (director and producer) bought us our first store in Budhwar Peth,” says Sajid. Omarsaheb Mirajkar settled in Kolhapur and provided instruments to Prabhat Studios for the background music that then accompanied silent films. As movies witnessed a technological revolution in India and slowly began to incorporate sound into the video itself, live background music became redundant. But Shantaram still felt the need to retain Omarsaheb’s services, foreseeing a future requirement in his films. And when Prabhat Studios moved to Pune, it bought store space from them.

A craftsman employed by Mirajkars working on an instrument. (Express photo by Arul Horizon).

Since then, the Mirajkar boutique has been the favorite destination of the city’s maestros. Pandit Bhimsen Joshi shared a family connection with Sajid’s father, Yusuf. “I still remember the early days of Sawai Gandharva Mahotsav (an acclaimed music festival in Pune attended by thousands of people every year). The festival had virtually no financial support. As children, we were responsible for collecting carpets from homes to seat the audience,” Sajid recalls.

Classical musician Kishori Amonkar, sitar maestro Shahid Parvez Khan and sitarist Ustad Usman Khan are among the few to frequent the shop. “There was a common idea among musicians earlier that only Calcutta sitars are the ones to trust. Ustad Usman Khan designed a sitar with my father and broke that idea when these sitars became world famous,” he says.

Making Instruments, Yesterday and Today

Instrument making requires a deep understanding of music and melody. “When we first started making instruments, it was very difficult to get Miraj the perfect pumpkin to make the ‘tambora’,” says Sajid. Trading steel jugs with sadhus for perfect pumpkins growing in the forest was then a sleight of hand.

Techniques have become advanced but the finesse guaranteed in musical instruments still holds true. “You need a basic understanding of music (swaradnyan — ‘swara’ or musical notations and ‘dnyan’ or knowledge) to make these instruments. From choosing the right quality of wood to perfecting the ink mixture applied to the tabla, tuning is most important when making instruments,” says Sajid.

Sajid Mirajkar, who belongs to the seventh generation of the Mirajkar clan, at his Yusuf Mirajkar’s Musical store in Budhwar Peth.

After the introduction of the harmonium in India towards the end of the 18th century, the process of tuning instruments became simpler with chord notations. “Previously, a person used to physically sit and sing in front of a person who would adjust the tambora to set the tone and get the right ‘Saa’ (the first notation of Indian classical music) or ‘swara’ natural,” says Sajid.

Warkaris and Mirajkar

“We’ve been making instruments for warkaris for as long as I can remember. We make veena (string instrument), pakhawaj (percussion), ektara (one string instrument) and harmonium for warkaris. We keep at least 20 pieces of each instrument ready 2 months before the ‘waari’ (pilgrimage) reaches Pune,” says Sajid.

This work has never been lucrative, he adds. “Warkaris came into the store at 2 a.m. to have the instruments repaired and was never sent away disappointed. For us, religion is not important, what is (important) is the ultimate goal of attaining parameshwar (supreme being). As the warkaris chant the name of the Lord, helping them with whatever is needed makes me feel like I have a small contribution in this great effort to unite with the Lord,” he said.

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Strand Book Store to host ‘The Music Never Ends’ literary event with Peter Shapiro and David Fricke https://deimel.biz/strand-book-store-to-host-the-music-never-ends-literary-event-with-peter-shapiro-and-david-fricke/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 17:20:41 +0000 https://deimel.biz/strand-book-store-to-host-the-music-never-ends-literary-event-with-peter-shapiro-and-david-fricke/ Strand Book Store to host ‘The Music Never Ends’ literary event with Peter Shapiro and David Fricke Strand Book Store has announced an upcoming conversation with veteran concert promoter and author Peter Shapiro as he discusses his new book, The Music Never Stops: What 10,000 Shows Taught Me About Life, Freedom, and the Pursuit of […]]]>

Strand Book Store to host ‘The Music Never Ends’ literary event with Peter Shapiro and David Fricke

Strand Book Store has announced an upcoming conversation with veteran concert promoter and author Peter Shapiro as he discusses his new book, The Music Never Stops: What 10,000 Shows Taught Me About Life, Freedom, and the Pursuit of Magicwhich was co-written by Relix editor Dean Budnick. The event will take place on August 9 at 7 p.m. in the Rare Book Room on the 3rd floor of the Strand Bookstore.

David Fricke, longtime editor and writer at rolling stone will join Shapiro in the conversation. The two music industry greats will discuss Shapiro’s debut novel, which gives readers insight into the author’s vivid life experiences, from operating Tribecca’s legendary Wetlands Preserve to reopening the legendary Capitol. Theater and, inevitably, to establishing a legacy with the various halls of the Brooklyn Bowl.

The music never stops delves into these experiences through the lens of Shapiro’s 50 Most Iconic Shows, earning him the title “the most outstanding independent concert promoter since Bill Graham,” a sentiment affirmed in Variety.

To attend the upcoming event, people can purchase a copy of The Music Never Stops: What 10,000 Shows Taught Me About Life, Freedom, and the Pursuit of Magic or purchase a general admission ticket. Buy tickets for the book event here.

Learn more about Shapiro’s upcoming publication by reading the original book announcement.

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