Music shop – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 07:09:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://deimel.biz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music shop – Deimel http://deimel.biz/ 32 32 In Tampa, Lucy Sparrow feels her most ambitious setup yet https://deimel.biz/in-tampa-lucy-sparrow-feels-her-most-ambitious-setup-yet/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 21:13:11 +0000 https://deimel.biz/in-tampa-lucy-sparrow-feels-her-most-ambitious-setup-yet/ Two years in the making, Lucy Sparrow today unveiled her most intricate exhibit yet – a fully hushed supermarket, stocked with every sculptural grocery store one could need. With over 50,000 items, each individually designed and autographed by Sparrow herself, the new “Tampa Fresh Foods” facility in Tampa, Florida opens today for art buyers. This […]]]>

Two years in the making, Lucy Sparrow today unveiled her most intricate exhibit yet – a fully hushed supermarket, stocked with every sculptural grocery store one could need. With over 50,000 items, each individually designed and autographed by Sparrow herself, the new “Tampa Fresh Foods” facility in Tampa, Florida opens today for art buyers. This immersive exhibition is a kaleidoscopic, interactive and breathtaking experience for children and adults alike.

Photograph by BFA, courtesy of Art Production Fund.

Originally from the UK, Sparrow launched her career in London and quickly made waves in the art world in 2014 when she created the installation ‘Cornershop’ – a small traditional English shop stocked with shop wares general true to life made entirely of felt. . It was just the beginning. Soon after, she had her first US exhibition at SCOPE Miami Beach Art Fair 2015, which launched her art into the market. Over the next few years, Sparrow continued to manufacture a variety of felt environments in global hotspots such as Montreal, Los Angeles, Beijing and New York. His imaginary countries constantly simulated everyday environments like supermarkets, bodegas, pharmacies and delicatessens. His exhibits are not just sensory experiences, but serve as social commentary on pressing issues: access to health care, the importance of mental health, gentrification, and gun control.

“Tampa Fresh Foods” is Sparrow’s latest and greatest work, which took two years to design and two weeks to install. It is strategically located on Water Street near some of Tampa’s finest restaurants, live music venues, and ocean views. The installation is presented by the Vinik Family Foundation in partnership with the Art Production Fund, a non-profit organization that commissions projects that bring humanity together and expand public knowledge of contemporary art.

Photograph by BFA, courtesy of Art Production Fund.

The “Tampa Fresh Foods” supermarket has an impressive produce aisle with every fruit and vegetable imaginable – limes, green beans, carrots, bananas, watermelons, potatoes and more. Plus, there’s a seafood counter, a take-out section with packaged sushi, a deli section, ATMs, and checkouts that even have automatic belts, all made of felt. Lucy explains that she uses felt as a medium because it’s a “leveller of who can buy art, who’s supposed to buy art, and who comes to see the art.”

Photograph by BFA, courtesy of Art Production Fund.

The exhibition is a daily errand turned artistic getaway, and unlike traditional artistic settings, it is meant to be touched and explored. All felt sculpture items are arranged on racks, shelves, bins and freezers where visitors can pick up and choose which ones they wish to purchase and bring them to the checkout. As a loving acknowledgment of the facility’s Florida context, the place where its felt shop facilities began in the United States, Sparrow includes Florida specialties including citrus fruits, tropical fruits, local seafood, state beer, Cuban bread and cigars, all intentionally displayed in a cigar humidor. room to give the audience the most authentic experience.

Photograph by BFA, courtesy of Art Production Fund.

There will be a limited number of guests permitted to enter the market at a time in order to adhere to COVID-19 protocols and public safety. Making a special appearance, Sparrow also said she would be there every day of the show, making the experience of going to the grocery store even more exhilarating.

Hear directly from the artist talk about “Tampa Fresh Foods” on Cultured’s Instagram.

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Saving the Old School Sound: NJ Record Stores Are Preserving Musical Relics https://deimel.biz/saving-the-old-school-sound-nj-record-stores-are-preserving-musical-relics/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 16:03:55 +0000 https://deimel.biz/saving-the-old-school-sound-nj-record-stores-are-preserving-musical-relics/ New Jersey has a remarkable number of independent and idiosyncratic vinyl record stores throughout the state. There should be a tour of all of its vinyl record stores because they get right to the heart of our state’s charms, history, distinctive attitude and variety. Shops range from hip little boutiques that feel like they’re on […]]]>

New Jersey has a remarkable number of independent and idiosyncratic vinyl record stores throughout the state. There should be a tour of all of its vinyl record stores because they get right to the heart of our state’s charms, history, distinctive attitude and variety. Shops range from hip little boutiques that feel like they’re on someone’s mind, to spacious, high-end record havens. One thing they all share is owners who are passionate about music on vinyl.

Photo by Manuel Igrejas

Yes, vinyl is back and better than ever. Vinyl sales continued to rise, increasing 29.2% to $619.6 million in 2020 from $479.5 million in 2019. Rising vinyl sales offset the continued decline in sales CDs, and artists are now recording on vinyl. (Country singer Kacey Musgraves is hot in the vinyl space.)

Stepping into New Jersey record stores is like stepping into history. Among the pleasures of vinyl records, their pleasant and reassuring format; the artwork on the cover that gives you an idea of ​​what to expect inside, and – they have liner notes you can read. Then there is the ceremonial and tactile aspect of playing the disc. You don’t just set it up. You gently remove the record from its paper sleeve, carefully place it on the turntable, and touch the stylus (needle) even more carefully to the album. Since you’ve earned it, you can sit back, listen to the album and let it overwhelm you. No skipping, sampling, no distractions: you become one with the music.

There is also the issue of sound quality. Vinyl (analog) sound is considered “warmer” by some, and the analog fade out is kinder to the psyche than the abrupt end of the CD. I remember reading in the NY Times that Dusty Springfield sang “The gaze of love” on theCasino Royale” album was considered the pinnacle of analog listening pleasure. Darren Revilla of Revilla Grooves and Gear in Milltown supported me on this.

Here is a sampling of some of the independent record stores in our state.

Elmwood Park Musical Connection. Photo by Manuel Igrejas

Music Connection to Elmwood Park is on a quiet street off River Road. Once you enter you are overwhelmed by the sheer volume: a large room with shelves and racks of records, a smaller CD section and a few assorted cassettes and DVDs and 45s. You could easily spend half a day there.

Address: 12 Summit Ave., Elmwood Park, NJ 07407

Music Merchants in Westwood. Photo by Manuel Igrejas

music merchants in Westwood is lighter and brighter with an extensive collection. Owner John Schlapak founded the store in 1979. With his distinctive and pungent take on things, he could be mistaken for a particularly sassy resident of Middle-earth. Besides all the goodies in his store, he’s fun to talk to.

Address: 157 Westwood Ave, Westwood, NJ 07675

Revilla Grooves and Gear in Milltown. Photo by Manuel Igrejas

Revilla grooves and gear in Milltown has a chill, Jedi vibe that appeals to true sound geeks. The displays are well organized and you can listen to music on headphones at three listening stations with state-of-the-art equipment in front of the store. If you walk through the bead curtain in the back, you’ll find a cozy room with a sofa where you can test out the top-notch sound systems that Revilla has on display in the next room. Owner Darren worked at the legendary Princeton Record Exchange before opening his place. Whether you are a true believer or a neophyte, Revilla is worth a look.

Address: 126 North Main St., Milltown, NJ 08850

Scotti Record Store in Summit. Photo by Manuel Igrejas

Gary Scotti from Scotti Record Store in Summit knows its business. Scotti’s, founded in 1956 by his father, is a bright and welcoming 2,000 square foot store that sells vinyl, CDs, cassettes (they’re making a comeback), t-shirts, mugs and stereo equipment . Everything is neatly categorized: rock, hip-hop, jazz, classical music and movie soundtracks. What is Gary listening to? A mix of classic rock and new artists, like Jason Isbell and the Black Pumas. He also does a big business in Christmas records. Like most record dealers, he buys used vinyl, and he explained the concept of matrix numbers – the alphanumeric code stamped into the end-of-record groove area at the end of a record. It can tell a reseller whether a record is an original pressing or a reissue, which affects its value.

Address: 351 Springfield Ave, Summit, NJ 07901

In Station 1, a recording of the 1977 film “Eraserhead” can be found, which is packed with a haunting soundtrack. Photo by Manuel Igrejas

Station 1 Books Vinyl and Vintage Shop is a beautiful store inside the old Pompton Lakes train station. Owner Daniel Salsberg was an online bookseller when he bought the place four years ago. Now records, mostly vinyl, account for 85% of sales. Music director Joe Smith said the biggest vinyl sales were of classic rock, punk or metal and jazz of the Miles Davis, John Coltrane variety. I asked him what the most valuable vinyl records were: 13th Floor Elevators (one of the first psychedelic rock bands of the 60s) and the early Zombies. Station 1 also sells turntables, DVDs, VHS, and an intriguing assortment of books you won’t find at Barnes & Noble.

Address: 1 Station Plaza, Pompton Lakes, NJ 07442

New Brunswick Spina Records. Photo by Manuel Igrejas

Rutgers alumnus Andrew Spina opened the SPina Records in 2014 to a cozy store in the basement, then moved to 118 Easton Ave. in 2017. A record collector since childhood, he saw the growing interest in vinyl and got on board. The Hub City, with its bustling music scene, is home to several influential bands, like Screaming Females (he went to school with singer Marissa Paternoster) and Cook Thugless. A former musician himself, Andrew has bridged the gap between record lovers and coffee and has a partnership with Hidden Grounds Coffee. The Espresso Bar, at 4C Easton Ave., is minutes from Spina’s and offers hundreds of its hand-picked vinyl records to browse while you sip.

Address: 118 Easton Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Jack’s Music Store at the Red Bank. Photo courtesy of Jack’s Music Shoppe

From the street, Jack’s Music Store at Red Bank looks like a beautiful Parisian bookstore, circa 1920. Inside, it’s just as beautiful: a spacious 6,000 square feet filled with the best vinyl (and CDs and cassettes) in all genres. They are smart musicians (manager Tim Cronin was a sound man for bands). Its choice is vast, nicely arranged and well organized. And there are musical instruments to sample and buy in a room on the first floor.

Address: 30 Broad Street, Red Bank, NJ 07701

The record collector in Bordentown. Photo courtesy of The Record Collector

The record collector in idyllic Bordentown was Voted the “No. 1 Favorite Independent Record Store in the Tri-State Area” by Details Magazine. It’s a beautiful store in the heart of town. Like all the best stores, it has a huge selection of new music , used, rare and collectibles in all formats, and management has been doing so for over 40 years. At last count, the store held over a million vinyl records, 45s and CDs. And, like most stores, they also buy and trade almost anything that runs on a turntable or CD player.

Address: 358 Farnsworth Ave, Bordentown, NJ 08505

Country music at Cliffside Park. Photo by Manuel Igrejas

While researching this story, I came across Country Music at Cliffside Park, and I just had to check them out. It opened in 1934 as Taliaferro Radio and Electric and sold radios, record players and records. His daughter Joan started working there when she was 10 years old and eventually took over the business. It was renamed Music Country in the 1980s. Joan runs Music Country with her husband, Jim Demarest, a musician who once played for Sammy Davis Jr. It’s a small space tucked away in a busy block, and when I walked in , Jim played on a guitar. Although cramped, Music Country is well organized and full of musical treasures. The walls are lined with classic album covers such as those by Keely Smith, Bobby Darin and Sinatra which make the place a veritable museum of music history. Jim was a knowledgeable and charming guide.

Address: 728 Anderson Ave, Cliffside Park, NJ 07010

No “Visiting New Jersey’s Iconic Record Shop » (let’s make it a thing) would be complete without a visit to these enduring pioneers of the recording industry. But you don’t have to register for the whole tour. You can hop in your car and just a few miles from where you live in New Jersey, vinyl magic awaits.

Manuel Igrejas has worked in theater as a playwright and publicist on Broadway and elsewhere. He was a publicist for Blue Man Group for 15 years, and his other clients included Richard Foreman, John Leguizamo, Tony n’ Tina’s Wedding, STREB, Julie Harris and Peak Performances.

This article originally appeared in the Winter 2021 issue of Jersey’s Best. Subscribe here for in-depth access to everything that makes the Garden State great.

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Clarksville High students pay tribute to former theater manager in upcoming musical https://deimel.biz/clarksville-high-students-pay-tribute-to-former-theater-manager-in-upcoming-musical/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/clarksville-high-students-pay-tribute-to-former-theater-manager-in-upcoming-musical/ The Clarksville High School (CHS) drama department is honoring its former theater principal in an upcoming musical. The students are proud to present the iconic musical “Little Shop of Horrors” starting January 20 at Collins Auditorium. This is the first musical that CHS will present since January 2020. According to the theater department, this production […]]]>

The Clarksville High School (CHS) drama department is honoring its former theater principal in an upcoming musical. The students are proud to present the iconic musical “Little Shop of Horrors” starting January 20 at Collins Auditorium. This is the first musical that CHS will present since January 2020. According to the theater department, this production was prepared in honor of Mr. Dan Bullington. He was a longtime theater director at Clarksville High School. In August, “Mr. B” was diagnosed with stage IV pancreatic cancer. He was absent from the classroom for the entire 2021-2022 school year while undergoing treatment and officially retired from Clarksville Schools in December. department. He is known for helping students not only thrive in the classroom or on stage, but as people. “Little Shop of Horrors” will collect donations for Mr. Bullington’s medical bills at each performance and will dedicate the closing night (January 29) to the “beloved Mr. B.” Members of the public are encouraged to wear purple, the official color of pancreatic cancer, that evening. CHS’s “Little Shop of Horrors” will be presented on Thursday, January 20 at 7 p.m.; Friday, January 21 at 7 p.m.; Saturday January 22 at 2 p.m.; Thursday, January 27, at 7 p.m.; Friday, January 28 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, January 29 at 7 p.m. Ticket prices: $15 in advance online and $10 at the door for adults. $5 for students. Prior to the January 22 matinee performance, audience members can purchase a $25 ticket for Tea with Audrey, which includes finger foods and hors d’oeuvres. For an additional $5 donation, you can take a photo with Audrey II at any performance. simple, uneventful life until he comes across a plant he does not recognize. After trying every combination of water, soil and sun imaginable, the quick prick of a rose finger reveals the secret ingredient to the plant’s needs: blood. As a plant, Audrey II, begins to blossom and grow, the whole world becomes fascinated by the plant, and thus the plant’s healer. Seymour actually feels noticed for the first time in his life. He spends the musical struggle between his moral compass and the thrill of success. Dark comedy teaches audiences to be careful what they wish for — and most importantly — never to feed the plants.

The Clarksville High School (CHS) drama department is honoring its former theater director in an upcoming musical.

The students are proud to present the iconic musical “Little Shop of Horrors” starting January 20 at Collins Auditorium. This is the first musical that CHS will present since January 2020.

According to the Drama Department, this production was prepared in honor of Mr. Dan Bullington. He was a longtime theater director at Clarksville High School.

In August, “Mr. B” was diagnosed with stage IV pancreatic cancer. He was absent from the classroom for the entire 2021-2022 school year while undergoing treatment and officially retired from Clarksville Schools in December.

Throughout his 19 years at the CHS, Mr. B has had a lasting impact on many students, especially those involved in the theater department.

He is known for helping students not only thrive in the classroom or on stage, but also as people.

‘Little Shop of Horrors’ will collect donations for Mr. Bullington’s medical bills at each performance and dedicate closing night (January 29) to ‘beloved MB’ Viewers are encouraged to wear purple, the official color pancreatic cancer that night.

CHS’s “Little Shop of Horrors” premieres Thursday, Jan. 20 at 7 p.m.; Friday, January 21 at 7 p.m.; Saturday January 22 at 2 p.m.; Thursday, January 27, at 7 p.m.; Friday, January 28 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, January 29 at 7 p.m.

Ticket prices: $15 in advance online and $10 at the door for adults. $5 for students.

Prior to the January 22 matinee performance, audience members can purchase a $25 ticket for Tea with Audrey, which includes finger foods and hors d’oeuvres. For an additional $5 donation, you can take a photo with Audrey II at any performance.

More details on the musical:

Written by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken, ‘Little Shop of Horrors’ tells the story of a humble florist named Seymour who lives a simple, uneventful life until he stumbles upon a plant he doesn’t recognize. .

After trying every combination of water, soil, and sun imaginable, a quick prick of a rose reveals the secret ingredient the plant needs: blood.

As the plant, Audrey II, begins to thrive and grow, the whole world becomes fascinated with the plant, and thus the plant’s caregiver.

Seymour actually feels noticed for the first time in his life. He spends the music struggling between his moral compass and the thrill of success.

Dark comedy teaches audiences to be careful what they wish for — and most importantly — never to feed the plants.

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Port City Small Bites: Tails to Become German Beer Garden, Upcoming Coffee Festival, and More https://deimel.biz/port-city-small-bites-tails-to-become-german-beer-garden-upcoming-coffee-festival-and-more/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://deimel.biz/port-city-small-bites-tails-to-become-german-beer-garden-upcoming-coffee-festival-and-more/ The building at 115 S. Front St., formerly Tails Piano Bar, is being taken over by restaurateurs from YoSake, Husk and Dram + Morsel to become a German beer garden and restaurant. (Port City Daily/Shea Carver) SOUTHEAST NC – Lots of movement is happening around the Port City with regards to new openings and closings […]]]>
The building at 115 S. Front St., formerly Tails Piano Bar, is being taken over by restaurateurs from YoSake, Husk and Dram + Morsel to become a German beer garden and restaurant. (Port City Daily/Shea Carver)

SOUTHEAST NC – Lots of movement is happening around the Port City with regards to new openings and closings of restaurants, food trucks, bars and bottle shops, as well as the launch of organizational and local food events and festivals. non-profit. While Port City Daily already covers the majority of this news, smaller shifts and changes sometimes go unnoticed.

READ MORE: Find the other culinary news of the week

“Small Bites” offers another way to let readers know what’s going on in the local food scene – what to expect when it comes to the expansion of existing establishments or menu changes, temporary closures and renovations, overtime or grand openings, pop-up events and other newsworthy information.

From the piano bar to the beer garden and restaurant

The team behind Husk, YoSake and Dram + Morsel are preparing to open their fourth location in downtown Wilmington: a German beer garden and restaurant, according to co-owner Justin Smith.

Smith and his partners, his wife Becca Smith, Gil Johnson and Kyra Tebo, have taken over the former Tails Piano Bar at 115 S. Front St.

“I’ve always loved this building,” said Smith, who admitted he’d watched it for years, even before Tails opened in 2018 (the bar closed in fall 2020 after being forced to close during the pandemic).

Aubriana’s operated in the building in the mid-2000s as one of downtown’s fine dining options. Before that, it served as the famous Mickey Ratz, a popular bar in the 90s.

Last summer, the availability of space presented itself.

“A lot of times when we go out of town we end up in various German places for a quick snack or a beer, and use it as a hangout with friends because of the large common areas, and we like to be there. outside,” Smith added. “We’re going to this great place in Brooklyn called Black Forest.”

Currently, Wilmington’s Front Street restaurant seats about 40 people inside and 60 on its outdoor patio, according to Smith. Although the owners of the business are not yet ready to reveal the name of the restaurant and beer garden, Smith envisions it as a destination in downtown Wilmington, offering a unique dining experience with communal seating and smaller. No construction should be carried out on the building itself, except for aesthetic improvements.

The restaurateurs are currently working on obtaining permits for the faucet systems. Smith said the goal was to focus on German lagers from local craft breweries – “or their version of a German beer, a stout, a pale ale, whatever it is.” The restaurant will also offer traditional German drinks and will have all ABC permits.

YoSake chef Erin Wiley, who Smith says is part German, takes the lead on the menu. Although some dishes are traditional, it will mainly be an interpretation of German cuisine.

“It will be more like a fusion,” Smith added, “similar to how YoSake is infused with Asian-American descent.”

Schnitzel, spaetzle, sausages, pretzels, sandwiches and salads feature on the preliminary menu, along with goulash and seafood. Sauerbraten (tender roast beef that has marinated for several days) can be offered as a special one day a week.

Smith said they would also work with an authentic German grocery store through one of its suppliers.

“We are still establishing price levels,” he said, as food prices rise and fall, with supply shortages still heavily affecting the industry. “We’ll have dips up to some of our seafood probably ranging from $8 to $18, and our sandwiches, sausages and meats ranging between $12 and $15.”

Entries will go up to $25.

Smith said if clearance and renovation of the space go as planned, he hopes to be open in the spring.

Tailwind Concessions, which operates ILM’s restaurants and snack bars, is expanding by February, offering a 50-seat full-service restaurant, a 25-seat cafe and two satellite bars serving 12 to 16 customers each. (Courtesy of Tailwind Concessions)

Tailwind Concessions expands at ILM

As Wilmington International Airport (ILM) undergoes its $68 million terminal expansion, its concession areas are also undergoing an overhaul. National company Tailwind Concessions works with 35 airports nationwide to help feed and quench the thirst of travelers moving between cities around the world.

According to spokesperson Jess Backhaus, Tailwind has operated at ILM since 2005. “We have gone through many transformations as the airport has grown and moved over the years,” he said.

Tailwind has used three areas inside the ILM at a time, although it has dropped to two in recent years. Lately they have had to work in temporary spaces as the airport has been under construction since 2018.

READ MORE: ILM incorporates $7 million in baggage claim upgrades into multi-year expansion project

By the time Tailwind completes construction of its new dining and dining spaces, it will have four concession areas for consumers to use. To be unveiled in February, they will include a full-service restaurant added in the middle of the lobby, as well as a cafe and two satellite bars.

The restaurant will seat 50 people and will offer an expanded menu of around 30 dishes, including starters, sandwiches, salads and main courses.

The cafe will seat 25 people and serve a wide range of premium coffee drinks, in addition to offering a “very large fresh take-out section,” Backhaus said.

The satellite bars will seat between 12 and 16 people and will serve locally roasted beers – from Wrightsville Beach Brewery and Edward Teach, for example – as well as locally made spirits from Blue Shark and End of Days.

Construction began in December 2021, with help from Harris Construction and architect John Reese, Buckhaus confirmed. While he can’t reveal the names of the establishments yet — Tailwind is working with the airport administration to localize the names of their concessions based on the region they represent — he said the aesthetic will have a coastal atmosphere.

“Lots of different shades of blue, reclaimed barn wood, lots of white subway tiles – fresh, bright but also a rustic look,” Backhaus described.

Tailwind will be hiring more crew in the coming weeks as it nears its official opening. Currently, she employs about 15 or 20 people at ILM.

“Our staff fluctuates and in the summer it’s much larger just because of the volume of travellers,” Backhaus said.

Wilmington Coffee Fest is coming

What started as a coffee tour in 2018 has grown into a full-fledged festival, celebrating the art of Wilmington’s artisan coffee scene.

Wilmington Coffee Fest returns Saturday, January 29, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., after Covid-19 put the event on hiatus last year. There will be tastings from over a dozen coffee vendors, seminars, coffee competitions, music, food trucks and local art vendors. Sweets will also be served by local bakeries and food vendors.

The festival will take place in two breweries and will be held outdoors, to be spaced out by the current increase in the number of pandemics. Attendees will meet at Waterline (721 Surry St.) from 9 a.m. to noon and Hi-Wire (1020 Princess St.) from noon to 3 p.m.

Tickets are $25 ($35 per day) for one venue or $40 for both ($50 per day) and include a tote bag, limited-edition WCF 2022 espresso cup, full vendor access, lectures and samples.

There’s also VIP admission for $60, which includes a launch party and early check-in on Friday, January 28, from 6-9 p.m. Attendees can collect their goody bag, meet and greet all vendors, receive two free gifts. drink tickets and enjoy live music. VIP admission also allows early access to both venues, starting at 8:30 a.m. at Waterline and 11:30 a.m. at Hi-Wire.

Tickets can be purchased here.

The Green House offers a new lunch menu, which includes various salads. Above, the winter caprese, with roasted butternut squash, mozzarella, sage, candied walnuts and brown butter vinaigrette. (Courtesy of Green House)

New cards

Wilmington’s vegan gourmet establishment, The Green House, launched a new lunch menu last week: sides ($7), salads ($13) and small plates ($15).

Highlights include warm potato salad (turmeric marinated cauliflower, mushroom bacon, red peas, golden raisin and caper vinaigrette), ‘krab’ dip (Lion’s Mane mushrooms, sweet and spicy peppers, lentil chips) and a root vegetable poutine (tubers, miso sauce and aged almond cheese).

There’s also a winter caprese salad that looks like a work of art, with roasted butternut squash, mozzarella, sage, candied walnuts and a brown butter vinaigrette.

The Green House accepts reservations and is open for lunch (11 a.m. to 3 p.m.) and dinner (5 p.m. to 9 p.m.), Wednesday through Sunday.

Across the bridge on the beach in Wrightsville, Blockade Runner has also released a new menu for its jazz brunch. Every Sunday, diners are treated to live jazz performed by Marc Siegel and his guests while enjoying freshly prepared dishes, with ingredients sourced from local farms and markets.

The menu was created by Blockade Runner Chef Jessica Cabo and Sous Chef Shaun Fenix, who took inspiration from the Monterey Jazz Festival (chefs will change the menu quarterly, depending on which destinations host guests). world-famous jazz nights). Offerings include items like Fisherman’s Wharf-inspired clam chowder served in a sourdough bowl, crab and goat cheese quiche, salted salmon Benedict waffle, and lemon ricotta pancakes. Several vegetarian and vegan dishes are also included, such as mushroom toast and tacos.

Item prices range from $7 to $20. Brunch is served from 10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and reservations can be made by calling 877-684-8009.


Got any food or beverage news? Email info@portcitydaily.com

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Stockport’s music-themed pie shop moves to Manchester https://deimel.biz/stockports-music-themed-pie-shop-moves-to-manchester/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:04:50 +0000 https://deimel.biz/stockports-music-themed-pie-shop-moves-to-manchester/ Stockport lockdown favourite, Ate Days A Week, has announced plans to move its award-winning Wigan handmade pies and kebabs to Manchester this spring. Known for its upscale pies, fresh fish and chips and gourmet sandwiches (not to mention its famous Wigan kebabs), the music-themed restaurant has made a name for itself with dishes like Don’t […]]]>

Stockport lockdown favourite, Ate Days A Week, has announced plans to move its award-winning Wigan handmade pies and kebabs to Manchester this spring.

Known for its upscale pies, fresh fish and chips and gourmet sandwiches (not to mention its famous Wigan kebabs), the music-themed restaurant has made a name for itself with dishes like Don’t Look Back In Banger and (I Just) Mort dans votre bar since its launch in 2020.

It was a meteoric rise for the brand, which quickly went from being a take-out to opening a brick-and-mortar location in a former chippy on Vernon Street in Stockport.

Image: I ate days a week

Now chef-owner Andy James is moving again, this time downtown, having secured a site just off Albert Square to open Ate Days A Week under a new name, Come Together, continuing the musical theme from Manchester.

As part of the move, it will expand its menu to include all-day breakfast options and Sunday roasts on the weekends – as well as delivery of dishes that Ate Days is already known and loved for.

That means the likely return of its three-cheese sandwich and bone marrow burger, Live Forcheddar, and possibly even Pie of the Tiger, winner of the 2021 British Pie Award.

Stockport's music-themed pie shop moves to Manchester, The Manc
Ate Days A Week’s breakfast pie Bake me up before you Go-Go, stuffed with Olde English sausage, bacon beans, aged cheddar cheese and a homemade hash brown inside flaky shortcrust pastry. / Image: I ate days a week

As for the existing Stockport site, it will now become fully dedicated to Notion, a deep south dive bar concept also launched by Andy this summer which sells 50p chicken wings, beers and cocktails.

Sharing the news on social media this week, Andy warned his followers that they faced their last chance to get pies from the Stockport site. He said: “I think it’s a good time to tell you that today is your last chance to get our amazing award-winning pies from our Stockport site. on UberEats.

Explaining that the Stockport site will “become fully Notion”, he added: “It was not an easy decision to make, but the way last year has gone makes sense”.

Stating that he wanted to “move Ate Days A Week to a site that allows us to continue to push what we do, to get bigger and better and to fully thrive”, he acknowledged that “the location will play a vital role” while hinting that followers should head to @cometogethermcr for more.

Stockport's music-themed pie shop moves to Manchester, The Manc
Image: I ate days a week

Ate Days A Week is already selling an amazing breakfast pie (Bake Me Up Before You Go Go), which is stuffed with Olde English sausages, bacon beans, aged cheddar cheese and homemade hash inside. shortcrust pastry and puff pastry.

Stockport's music-themed pie shop moves to Manchester, The Manc
Image: I ate days a week

Now, however, chef Andy is looking to build on that with the creation of a new Manchester all-day breakfast menu at Come Together.

The teased previews on Instagram already have us very excited, showing an epic fry loaded with all the essentials: fried egg, crispy bacon, fatty sausages, beans, tomatoes, black pudding and homemade hash browns.

We can’t wait to see what else he has to offer. To keep up to date with future developments ahead of the Spring 2022 opening, be sure to follow @cometogethermcr on Instagram.

Feature Image – Ate Days A Week

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Miles Kane announces chicken shop pop-up in London https://deimel.biz/miles-kane-announces-chicken-shop-pop-up-in-london/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 20:25:34 +0000 https://deimel.biz/miles-kane-announces-chicken-shop-pop-up-in-london/ Miles Kane has announced plans to open a pop-up chicken store in London. The store – dubbed Kane’s Crispy Chicken Wings – will open on January 21 to celebrate the release of the Last Shadow Puppets singer’s new solo album, “Change The Snow.” This will see Kane take over Randy’s Wing Bar in Hackney, with […]]]>

Miles Kane has announced plans to open a pop-up chicken store in London.

The store – dubbed Kane’s Crispy Chicken Wings – will open on January 21 to celebrate the release of the Last Shadow Puppets singer’s new solo album, “Change The Snow.”

This will see Kane take over Randy’s Wing Bar in Hackney, with tickets (which include admission, food and a live Kane show) priced at £ 15. You can pre-order them on the singer-songwriter’s website here.

In a press release, Kane said, “The wings will be cooked and served by yours truly and my good friend Big Lew using my own Buffalo sauce that I worked on with Randy’s Wing Bar. I will also be doing an acoustic performance of songs from my new album along with some old favorites.

Take a look at Kane helping prepare the signature wings below:

Earlier today (January 10), Kane announced he would postpone his next UK tour until later in 2022, citing the growing number of COVID-19 cases. “For the safety of my fans, my group and my team, it just felt like we moved the dates. I’ll be back on the road in May and look forward to seeing you all. The tickets remain valid for the new dates, ”he added.

Kane has released four ‘Change The Snow’ singles so far, including ‘See Ya When I See Ya’, ‘Caroline’, ‘Don’t Let It Get You Down’ and ‘Nothing’s Ever Gonna Be Good Enough’ with Corinne Bailey Rae.

Speaking previously of ‘Change The Show’ – the sequel to 2018’s ‘Coup De Grace’ – Kane explained that the record “was born out of an intense period of introspection; having all this unexpected time in my hands” due to the ongoing pandemic. He went on to say that the new material reflects “great highs, great lows, daydreams, real friends and deep feelings,” adding that he has created a “truly uplifting album.”

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Sony Music Entertainment UK triples its profits https://deimel.biz/sony-music-entertainment-uk-triples-its-profits/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 21:50:09 +0000 https://deimel.biz/sony-music-entertainment-uk-triples-its-profits/ Music giant behind Beyonce and Robbie Williams sees profits triple in UK branch after downplaying impact of record store closings By Alex Lawson, Financial Mail on Sunday Posted: 4:50 p.m. EST, January 8, 2022 | Update: 5:58 p.m. EST, January 8, 2022 The music giant behind Beyonce and Robbie Williams has seen its profits triple […]]]>

Music giant behind Beyonce and Robbie Williams sees profits triple in UK branch after downplaying impact of record store closings










The music giant behind Beyonce and Robbie Williams has seen its profits triple in its UK branch after downplaying the impact of record store closings.

Sony Music Entertainment UK made a profit of £ 98million in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, up from £ 31million the previous year. Turnover was flat at £ 280million, according to accounts filed with Companies House.

Directors of the company said that due to the pandemic, “there has been a decline in the market for sales of physical products and some ancillary revenue sources.” However, he said the continued growth and cost savings had “minimized” the impact.

In tune: Sony Music Entertainment UK made a profit of £ 98million as of March 31, 2021, up from £ 31million the previous year

The UK branch of Sony is part of the Japanese conglomerate and has seen its profits increase due to a one-off increase in the group’s internal revenues. It did not pay a dividend last year.

The profit surge comes as a row rages on record label revenue from streaming. Last year, MPs called for artists to receive a greater share of streaming revenue.

The government has asked the Competition and Markets Authority to conduct a study on the major record companies, Universal, Sony and Warner. Last week, independent music companies called for its extension to include Apple and Spotify.

The growth of streaming helped Universal Music Group float to $ 40 billion last year. But there are signs that streaming growth is slowing, with UK vinyl sales growth surpassing last year.

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How important does Apple want to be in the media? https://deimel.biz/how-important-does-apple-want-to-be-in-the-media/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 06:55:52 +0000 https://deimel.biz/how-important-does-apple-want-to-be-in-the-media/ January 8, 2022 AVIOLIN SET Sadly, Jon Stewart, an American comedian, makes a mock appeal to viewers. “Each year, thousands of hours of high-quality content go unread,” he says earnestly. “Because good, hard-working people … don’t know how to find Apple TV+. “ Listen to this story Your browser does not support the item . […]]]>

AVIOLIN SET Sadly, Jon Stewart, an American comedian, makes a mock appeal to viewers. “Each year, thousands of hours of high-quality content go unread,” he says earnestly. “Because good, hard-working people … don’t know how to find Apple TV+. “

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The world’s most valuable company can afford a few jokes at its expense. In the past year, the tech colossus raked in $ 366 billion in revenue, a third more than in 2020. On January 3, its market capitalization briefly exceeded $ 3 trillion (see chart 1) . The mere billions he is investing in media, including a new television show hosted by Mr. Stewart, are pocket money for the Silicon Valley giant.

Yet some 300 miles (480 km) along the coast in Hollywood, where executives laughed at the big tech dilettantes of the North, Apple isn’t messing with the media. While it lags well behind Netflix and others, Apple has enough cash to weather the increasingly costly streaming wars that threaten to bankrupt other players. One question keeps rivals awake at night: what does Apple want from show business?

Apple became a big fan in music when it launched iTunes 21 years ago this week. It took a cut in song sales and moved hundreds of millions of iPods for people to listen to. Later, iTunes also sold movies, and the company hoped to make the same model work on television, where the market is an order of magnitude larger than music. But pay for downloads has been replaced by all-you-can-eat subscriptions, launched by Spotify in music and Netflix in TV. Unlike downloaded music or movies, subscriptions can be easily moved between platforms. Thus, Apple, seeing few opportunities to lock consumers into its devices, abandoned the streaming revolution.

Today, he’s back in the media game, and with more force than Mr. Stewart’s joke suggests (see graph 2). Apple Music, launched in 2015, is the second-largest streamer after Spotify. Apple TV+, which has now been in existence for two years, is the fourth-largest video service outside of China by number of subscribers, according to Omdia, a data company. Over the past two years, Apple has made smaller media bets, including Arcade, a subscription gaming package, News +, a publishing bundle, and Fitness +, which offers video aerobics classes. There is talk of an audiobook service later this year.

Like Amazon, another tech giant with wiggle room in the media, Apple has been able to roll out its offerings faster in more countries than most of its Hollywood rivals, which have had to build direct-to-consumer businesses to start from nothing. And it can afford to be generous with free trials: less than a third of Apple TV+ subscribers pay for the service, says Omdia. He’s had a few hits, most notably “Ted Lasso,” which won a series of Emmy awards in September. But a back catalog is missing, resulting in high customer churn rates. Smaller competitors like Paramount + (which is part of Viacom SCS) and Peacock (from CNBUniversal) have new limited offerings but libraries that are decades old.

Old-media companies have been intrigued by Apple’s intermittent outings in their territory, which at times seem half-hearted. Winning in streaming mostly depends on the splurge on content. But deep-pocketed Apple spent just over $ 2 billion on movies and TV in 2021, compared to $ 9 billion from Amazon and $ 14 billion from Netflix, estimates Ampere Analysis, a research firm. He doesn’t care much about marketing his efforts. And although medialand has cooed executives that Apple has poached, such as Jamie Erlicht and Zack Van Amburg of Sony and Richard Plepler of HBO, Silicon Valley insiders say Apple is keeping its own tech techs on other projects.

Indeed, as Hollywood frets over Apple’s next move, many Silicon Valley residents wonder why it’s in the media. Neither market is a big deal for the world’s most valuable business. The entire global recorded music industry had sales of $ 22 billion in 2020, which is less than what Apple achieved just by selling iPads. In about a month, Apple generates as much revenue as Netflix in a year. Apples TV business depends on buying shows, rather than extracting rents from other people’s creations like it did in the iTunes era (and still does in its app store). And the “lock-in” effect on consumers is small, since Apple’s main media services are available on all platforms.

Apple’s renewed interest in the media can best be explained by the transformation of the corporate scale, which radically changes the calculation of worthwhile side-projects. Fifteen years ago, when Netflix started streaming, the billions involved in running a movie studio would have represented nearly a double-digit share of Apple’s annual revenue. At the time, executives from Silicon Valley were flying to Los Angeles, thinking, “We have a big checkbook, we could buy a bunch of content,” said Benedict Evans, technical analyst and former venture capitalist. “And they were going to have their first meeting in LA. And the folks in LA would tell them the price ”—when the tech people came home. In 2021 Apple TVThe estimated content budget of + represented 0.6% of the company’s turnover: “play money”, as Mr. Evans puts it.

The cost of running a studio can therefore be justified by modest profits for Apple. Streaming subscriptions may not lock people down as strongly as iTunes purchases, but Apple’s various services continue to create “meat hooks” on customers, making them spend more time with their devices and making a bit of a mess. more embarrassing to leave the Apple ecosystem, says Nick Lightle. , a former Spotify executive. The iPhone itself, which generated $ 192 billion in sales last year, or more than half of Apple’s total revenue, is sold as a subscription, says Evans. Anything that lowers the churn rate of iPhone subscribers, however small, is likely to pay off.

The media also do good marketing. Producing films with Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks strengthens Apple’s premium brand. Partnerships with pop stars keep it cool. And at a time when Silicon Valley is under attack for monopoly practices, invasion of privacy, subversion of democracy and more, Apple is producing podcasts worthy of Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousafzai and teaching kids fitness routines. . Few companies can consider a film studio to be a branch of public relations. A $ 3 billion company can.

“Apple is not playing the same game as many of its others [media] competitors, ”says Julia Alexander of Parrot Analytics, another data company. For one-rounders like Netflix, this is an uncomfortably asymmetrical competition. Yet Apple’s broader priorities can cripple its media ambitions as well. Apple TVthe lack of + library could be solved by purchasing someone else’s library; the company has been touted as a potential buyer of small studios like Lionsgate as well as giants like Disney. But Apple may hesitate to provoke the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC), which targets Silicon Valley. “If you are Apple and the FTC look at big tech, the last thing you want to do is make a huge acquisition, ”notes Ms. Alexander. Lina Khan, the FTCTech bashing chief examines recent $ 8.5 billion purchase from Amazon MGM Workshops; it doesn’t matter if the target is a relative tiddler in a fragmented market. As companies vie for control of the next highs in tech, from decentralized Web3 to virtual reality, catching the attention of regulators by buying old TV episodes could be a strategic mistake.

As long as they continue to help sell its devices and rebuild its brand, Apple will continue to invest in its multimedia services. It will cost more: Global spending on video content will exceed $ 230 billion in 2022, according to Ampere, almost double what it was a decade ago. As smaller competitors overspend and give up, Apple’s position may even grow stronger. But given its greater ambitions in other sectors, Apple should be content in the media to stick to its role as a supporting player.

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This article appeared in the Business section of the print edition under the headline “The Accidental Tycoon”


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Madison’s Music Store Recovers From December Storm Damage https://deimel.biz/madisons-music-store-recovers-from-december-storm-damage/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 03:13:07 +0000 https://deimel.biz/madisons-music-store-recovers-from-december-storm-damage/ NASHVILLE, Tennessee (WKRN) – The deadly December tornadoes devastated parts of Kentucky, but places in mid-Tennessee were also hit hard. A Madison music store owner is still working to repair his store weeks after the storm. Patrick Boyle owns New Vintage Music on Coreland Drive. He opened the store in September after the pandemic interrupted […]]]>

NASHVILLE, Tennessee (WKRN) – The deadly December tornadoes devastated parts of Kentucky, but places in mid-Tennessee were also hit hard. A Madison music store owner is still working to repair his store weeks after the storm.

Patrick Boyle owns New Vintage Music on Coreland Drive. He opened the store in September after the pandemic interrupted his touring gig as a guitar technician, but it didn’t take long for another disaster to occur.

“I just saw panels getting ripped off (the roof) like someone was peeling an onion or something,” Boyle said.


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Man killed in Halifax is remembered as devoted family man and passionate musician https://deimel.biz/man-killed-in-halifax-is-remembered-as-devoted-family-man-and-passionate-musician/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 10:43:23 +0000 https://deimel.biz/man-killed-in-halifax-is-remembered-as-devoted-family-man-and-passionate-musician/ A Halifax man who was killed Thursday is remembered as a passionate family man who enjoyed playing music and interacting with Insight Optometry clients. Police say Tony Nader, 55, was attacked and killed at his workplace. Friends and colleagues expressed shock at his death and praised him as a warm and friendly person who cared […]]]>

A Halifax man who was killed Thursday is remembered as a passionate family man who enjoyed playing music and interacting with Insight Optometry clients.

Police say Tony Nader, 55, was attacked and killed at his workplace. Friends and colleagues expressed shock at his death and praised him as a warm and friendly person who cared deeply for others.

Will Hansen said he and Nader met about five years ago and bonded out of a mutual love for guitars. The two bought, sold and traded instruments as a hobby.

“He was also a beloved musician in the Nova Scotia community, having completed his own projects and being part of bands in the area,” said Hansen.

“From the moment I met Tony, it occurred to me that his enthusiasm was contagious and that his generosity and kindness were there for everyone.”

Nader used to work at Insight Optometry, but Hansen said when the two “talked shop” it was about music. Hansen said Nader was a man of integrity and honesty.

“When you first met Tony you knew you had a lifelong friend,” Hansen said.

“I did not know his immediate family personally, but I do know that he was a dedicated family man and would have done anything for his wife and daughters. He will be sadly missed and I have to offer my sincere condolences to his family and friends. this senseless tragedy. “

Nader left behind a wife and two young children.

Talented musician

Susan Pfeiffer has known Nader for 30 years. They were friends, but she also saw her professional passion.

“Tony was the man responsible for keeping me in the tall glasses style,” she said on Friday. “I think he enjoyed the challenge of choosing my frames to match my style of eclectic artist.”

She said she was devastated to learn of his death.

Nader joined the COVID edition of the Ultimate Online Nova Scotia Kitchen Party last year and contributed to this video, showcasing his musical skills.

CBC interviewed Nader in 2016 for a story about the pressure of always having the last cell phone. At the time, he did not have one.

He said people spend far too much time engrossed in their phones when they should be engrossed in the world around them.

“I admire kids and dogs because kids and dogs live in the moment and as a society I don’t think we do,” Nader said.

“We record the moment. I think we take pictures of the moment and put them on Facebook, I’m not sure we’re all living in the moment. But I’m trying to live in the moment.”

Police said they responded to Insight Optometry’s call on Brunswick Street around 9:15 a.m. (AT) Thursday, where a man entered the clinic and attacked Nader. A client attempted to intervene and was also injured.

Cymon Felix Cormier, 25, of Halifax, has been charged with first degree murder in Nader’s death.

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