Their Mortal Remains exhibit kicks off in Los Angeles with drummer Nick Mason – San Bernardino Sun

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Nick Mason, drummer for British rock band Pink Floyd, officially launched Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains, an immersive exhibit that will run daily through January 9, 2022, at the Vogue Multicultural Museum in Los Angeles on Friday, September 3. .

As fans of all ages with opening day tickets lined the sidewalks on Hollywood Boulevard, Mason strolled through the exhibit, which features over 350 Pink Floyd artifacts, including oversized stage sets, props and private collectibles from the band members themselves, such as instruments, handwritten song lyrics, original artwork and more.

Mason stopped in front of an exhibition of his “Hokusai Wave” drum kit, which features the painting “The Great Wave” by Japanese artist Hokusai. Inspired by a tour of Japan, Mason asked artist Katy Hepburn to paint the drumheads in 1973.

“It’s just one of my favorite paintings anyway, but we used it as our tour logo in 1972, I think,” he said, examining the vintage Ludwig drum kit. “It lasted really well and I like it a lot. I like the drums as a kind of art object. I have a lot of affection for it, in fact I get another kit made to be more or less the same because I don’t want to take this one out on tour so I’m making a new one.

  • Visitors experience The Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains on Friday, September 3, 2021. The new show at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood is an immersive experience that delves deep into Pink Floyd’s career. The show runs through January 2022. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • A Pink Floyd showcase that is part of the Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains exhibit at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood through January 2022. The show is an immersive experience that delves deep into Pink Floyd’s career. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • A sketch for a Pink Floyd concert, as part of the Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains exhibit at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood through January 2022. The show is an immersive experience that delves deep into Pink Floyd’s career. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Original musical compositions at the Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains exhibit at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood through January 2022. The show is an immersive experience that delves deep into Pink Floyd’s career. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Visitors experience The Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains on Friday, September 3, 2021. The new show at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood is an immersive experience that delves deep into Pink Floyd’s career. The show runs through January 2022. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Visitors experience The Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains on Friday, September 3, 2021. The new show at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood is an immersive experience that delves deep into Pink Floyd’s career. The show runs through January 2022. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • The Lightbulb Suits featured artwork for the album “Delicate Sound of Thunder,” which is part of the Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains exhibit at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood through January 2022. The show is an immersive experience that delves deep into Pink’s career. Floyd. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Pink Floyd silicone masks that were used at concerts, as part of the Pink Floyd: Their Deadly Remains exhibit at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood through January 2022. The show is an immersive experience that delves deep into the Pink Floyd career. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason with one of his favorite drum kits now part of The Pink Floyd: Their Deadly Remains exhibit on Friday September 3, 2021. The new show at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood is an immersive experience which delves deeply into the career of Pink Floyd. The show runs through January 2022. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Visitors experience The Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains on Friday, September 3, 2021. The new show at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood is an immersive experience that delves deep into Pink Floyd’s career. The show runs through January 2022. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • The Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains exhibition opened on Friday at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood. The new show at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood is an immersive experience that delves deep into Pink Floyd’s career. The show runs through January 2022. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Visitors experience The Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains on Friday, September 3, 2021. The new show at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood is an immersive experience that delves deep into Pink Floyd’s career. The show runs through January 2022. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason discovers one of his favorite drum kits which is now part of The Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains exhibit on Friday, September 3, 2021. The new show at the Vogue Theater in Hollywood is an immersive experience of passage which delves deeply into the career of Pink Floyd. The show runs through January 2022. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

The exhibit was originally scheduled to open in early August, but was postponed for a month as shipping containers filled with parts for the exhibit were delayed due to COVID-19. Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains has already been seen by hundreds of thousands of fans in Europe, notably at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Los Angeles-based promoter Diego Gonzalez was one of those patrons and said he knew he had to bring the experience to Southern California. Gonzalez, who brought exhibitions to Mexico City featuring works by directors Tim Burton and Guillermo Del Toro and Swiss artist HR Giger, said he was impressed with the quality of this traveling multisensory exhibition, as it gave to both die-hard fans and new generations alike have the opportunity to experience the group’s live show in a museum.

“There is a generation of people who never got to see Pink Floyd [live]Gonzalez said in a Zoom video chat last month. “It’s just awesome. I think people are going to love it. I see people saying they come to see it in Los Angeles who have it too. seen in London and it’s exciting to see the reaction of people. My favorite thing to do is stand near the exit and see the smiles on people’s faces. You have fans who can listen to ‘Wish You Were Here ‘on repeat and never tire of it and people who see the guitar that David Gilmour wrote this song on and they have a strong connection to that instrument and there were tears. “

Mason said he couldn’t pick a single item he preferred, referring to the collection as more of an album of cuttings from the band’s five-decade career. He compared watching excited fans react to elements of the exhibit to receiving thunderous applause at a live concert.

“There is going to be something different for everyone,” he said. “Some people will be more interested in guitars and others may be more interested in artwork and are Syd Barrett fans. You may be drawn to one thing, but then come and see this collection of things together. . “

Just like the band, which put a lot of effort into studio experimentation and used all the technology available at the time to record albums like “Dark Side of the Moon”, “Wish You Were Here” and “The Wall ”, the exhibition is sound and visually high-tech and interactive. It’s in chronological order, starting with the London underground scene in 1967 and ending in the Performance Zone, an audiovisual space that includes a large inflatable flying pig and a video recreation of the last performance the group gave. of “Comfortably Numb”. at Live 8 in 2005.

Fans can also hear the band members themselves as recordings featuring Syd Barrett, Roger Waters, Richard Wright, David Gilmour and Mason comment on various aspects of their careers on portable audio devices handed out at the door. The exhibit features an original painting by Barrett as well as a replica of his famous mirrored Fender guitar. Also on display are Waters sketches from “The Wall”, a black leather stage cape and his Ovation bass guitar used from ’74 to ’78. And iconic album covers from exhibition co-creator Aubrey ‘Po’ Powell and the late Storm Thorgerson from design agency Hipgnosis are featured.

As the exhibit moves around the world, new objects are found and added, Mason said. For its first broadcast in North America, Michael Kamen’s 170-page annotated musical score for “The Wall” has been included.

Mason said he was fascinated and grateful that younger generations of fans appreciate Pink Floyd’s music – although a few young fans passed by Mason in the exhibit and he goes unrecognized.

“None of us expected rock music to last long anyway,” he said. “I remember Ringo Starr saying he was going to join a barber chain right after [The Beatles] second album. We all thought we got our audience together in a nice age group, which was probably our peer group, but if we can have some relevance to a younger audience, that’s extremely flattering.

The Pink Floyd exhibition: their remains

When: 11 am-6pm Monday to Friday; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday-Sunday Sept. 3-Jan. 9, 2022

Or: Vogue Multicultural Museum, 6675 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles

Tickets: $ 46 per person in advance on vmmla.com

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