What Happened Today (April 7): NPR

People pile into a bus on Thursday en route to a train station in Severodonetsk, as they attempt to flee eastern Ukraine.

Fadel Senna/AFP via Getty Images


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Fadel Senna/AFP via Getty Images


People pile into a bus on Thursday en route to a train station in Severodonetsk, as they attempt to flee eastern Ukraine.

Fadel Senna/AFP via Getty Images

As Thursday draws to a close in Kyiv and Moscow, here are the main developments of the day:

Ukrainian officials urge residents of eastern regions of Donestsk, Luhansk and Kharkiv evacuate immediately. Russian troops have now withdrawn from the northern cities of kyiv and Chernihiv, but are believed to be regrouping for a potential fresh attack in the east, where Moscow has recognized self-declared breakaway republics.

As US and European allies met in Brussels, Ukraine pushed for more military aid. Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba described his program in meetings with NATO foreign ministers as “weapons, weapons and weapons”.

The United Nations General Assembly has voted to suspend Russia from the Human Rights Council. The resolution cited reports of “gross and systematic violations and abuses of human rights” in Ukraine. The tally was 93 for and 24 against, with 58 abstentions. China voted no and India was among those who abstained.

Russia’s top diplomat accused Ukraine of backtracking on a draft peace deal – a comment Ukraine dismissed as propaganda. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said in a video address that Kyiv was amending demands related to Crimea, among other things. Ukraine’s chief negotiator noted that Lavrov was not part of the negotiating team. Lavrov also spoke of the “savage behavior” of Ukrainian forces, in an apparent nod to a graphic video released this week that appeared to show Ukrainian soldiers killing at least one wounded Russian POW.

Pink Floyd have announced the release of their first new music in 28 years, to raise funds for Ukrainians. The new single, “Hey Hey Rise Up”, features the vocals of Andriy Khlyvnyuk of Ukrainian band Boombox, who has interrupted his US music tour to join a territorial defense unit in Ukraine.

In depth

The daughters of Russian President Vladimir Putin have just been sanctioned. Here’s what we know about them.

A satellite photo shows that Russian troops were stationed in the Chernobyl radioactive zone.

The Ukrainians return to Borodyanka after the Russian withdrawal and find their town in ruins.

Chernihiv doctors testify about the fate of their hospital after the Russian bombings.

Finnish customs seize works of art worth millions of dollars destined for Russia.

Previous developments

You can read more of Thursday’s news here, as well as more in-depth reports and daily recaps here. Also, listen and subscribe to NPR Ukrainian state podcast for updates throughout the day.

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